NEWT-12.31.14-10K
Table of Contents

 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
____________________________________________ 
FORM 10-K
____________________________________________ 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014
Commission file number: 814-01035
 
____________________________________________ 
NEWTEK BUSINESS SERVICES CORP.
 ____________________________________________ 
  
Maryland
 
46-3755188
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
 
212 West 35th Street, 2nd Floor New York, New York
 
10001
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (212) 356-9500
 
 ____________________________________________  
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Name of Each Exchange
Title of Each Class
on Which Registered
 
 
Common Stock, par value $0.02 per share
NASDAQ Capital Market
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

  ____________________________________________  
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Section 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (Section 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company (all as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
 
Large accelerated filer
 
¨
Accelerated filer
 
¨
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer
 
x
Smaller reporting company
 
¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x
The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $71,516,000 as of the last business day of the registrant’s second fiscal quarter of 2014, based on a closing price that date of $13.70. For the purposes of calculating this amount only, all directors and executive officers of the Registrant have been treated as affiliates.
As of March 27, 2014 there were 10,206,301 shares issued and outstanding of the registrant’s Common Stock, par value $0.02 per share.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement relating to the registrant’s 2015 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days following the end of the Company’s fiscal year, are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K as indicated herein.
 


Table of Contents

NEWTEK BUSINESS SERVICES CORP.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Item
 
Page
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Table of Contents

PART I
On November 12, 2014, Newtek Business Services, Inc. merged with and into Newtek Business Services Corp., a newly-formed Maryland corporation, for the purpose of reincorporating in Maryland (the “Merger”), and thereafter filed an election to be regulated as a business development company (a “BDC”) under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (referred to herein as the "Conversion" or "BDC Conversion"). All subsidiaries and controlled portfolio companies (as defined below) became the property of Newtek Business Services Corp as part of the Merger. Except as otherwise noted, the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” “Company” and “Newtek” refer to Newtek Business Services, Inc. prior to the Conversion and its successor, Newtek Business Services Corp. following the Conversion.
On October 22, 2014, we effectuated the 1-for- 5 reverse stock split (the “Reverse Stock Split”). On November 18, 2014 we completed an offering of 2,530,000 shares of our common stock at an offering price of $12.50 per share for total gross proceeds of $31,625,000. Unless otherwise indicated, the disclosure in this annual report on Form 10-K gives effect to the Conversion and Reverse Stock Split.
ITEM 1. BUSINESS.
Overview
On November 12, 2014, we completed our conversion to a BDC. We are an internally managed, closed-end, non-diversified management investment company that has elected to be regulated as a BDC under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended. In addition, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we plan to elect to be treated as a regulated investment company ("RIC) under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"). As a BDC, we are required to comply with regulatory requirements, including limitations on our use of debt. We are permitted to, and expect to, finance our investments through borrowings. However, as a BDC, we are only generally allowed to borrow amounts such that our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, equals at least 200% after such borrowing. The amount of leverage that we employ depends on our assessment of market conditions and other factors at the time of any proposed borrowing. As a RIC, we generally will not have to pay corporate-level federal income taxes on any net ordinary income or net short-term capital gains that we distribute to our stockholders if we meet certain source-of-income, distribution, asset diversification and other requirements.
Newtek, “The Small Business Authority®, is a leading national lender and owns and controls certain controlled portfolio companies that provide a wide range of business and financial products to the small- and medium-sized business ("SMB") market, which we estimate to be over 27 million businesses in the U.S.. Our website, www.thesba.com, and our heightened branding strategy enable us to offer small businesses the ability to grow and prosper by obtaining from us:
Business Lending: Business loans for working capital, to acquire or expand a business or for the purchase of machinery and equipment
Electronic Payment Processing: Credit card, debit card, check conversion and ACH processing solutions
Ecommerce Services: Combinations of payment processing, online shopping cart tools, web site design, web hosting and web related services which enable businesses to establish a presence and commercial capability on the Internet in a quick and simple fashion
Managed Technology Solutions: Full service web hosting, including domain registration and online shopping cart tools; cloud computing plans and customized web design and development services
The Newtek Advantage™: A mobile, real-time operating platform for business intelligence putting all critical business transactions in real-time and enabling a business to access data on a smartphone, tablet, laptop or PC for eCommerce, credit/ debit transactions, website statistics, payroll, insurance and business loans.
Data Backup, Storage and Retrieval: Fast, secure, off-site data backup, storage and retrieval
Accounts Receivable Financing: Receivable financing and management services, lines of credit collateralized by receivable accounts
Insurance Services: Nationwide commercial, health and benefits, and personal lines of insurance
Payroll: Payroll management processing and employee tax filing.

1

Table of Contents

During 2014 we derived revenue through the sale of a business service or product to over 100,000 SMB accounts. We believe these businesses have historically been underserved by traditional financial institutions and typically lack the capital resources to build a competitive business and marketing infrastructure on their own. We use state of the art, web-based proprietary technology to provide low cost products and services to our SMB clients. We are a FinTech company and consider our patented, proprietary NewTracker® referral and tracking system, similar to what Salesforce.com does for tracking sales leads. Our Newtracker system tracks business referrals through our entire sales and marketing process for all alliance partners. It is as if we are putting a barcode, like delivery services do for packages, on a business service process. This gives full transparency to referral or alliance partners as to what our business service specialists are doing with their clients 24 hours a day, 7 days per week. This gives alliance partners comfort as to what our processing personnel are doing with their customers. It gives both parties a complete audit trail. It markedly helps manage our staff as “big brother is always watching” and the system measures their competency in real time. We acquire our customers through the use of what we believe is our state of the art, web-based proprietary technology which eliminates the need for paying commission to “feet on the street” sales personnel. In addition, we acquire customers through referrals from alliances with Fortune 500® companies, community banks, credit unions and others, all of whom have elected to offer one or more of our business services and financial products rather than try to provide them directly for their customers or members. Our alliance partners have historically interfaced with Newtek through their use of our NewTracker® system which enables complete transparency in the referral process. In 2014, we continued our major emphasis on placing resources behind the development of our coordinated marketing and media program focused on our branding strategy, featuring The Small Business Authority website, all intended to present the Company to the small, independent business audience as the authoritative presence in the SMB space across many areas of operations.

In today’s economic climate, SMBs have particular difficulty obtaining capital from traditional lending sources. While we do not compete directly with alternative online lenders such as Lending Club, Prosper.com, OnDeck Capital, Inc. and Kabbage Inc., we do provide similar financing solutions as an alternative to traditional lending. We believe there is significant demand for such alternative financing among SMBs. Our lending solutions and our controlled portfolio companies’ outsourced business solutions help clients manage and grow their businesses and compete effectively in today’s marketplace. We obtain our customers through referrals from various business partners, such as banks, insurance companies, credit unions and other affinity groups, as well as through our own direct sales force and advertising campaigns. We source, acquire, and process SMB customers without reliance on high cost sales staff and time consuming application processes, which is highly cost effective as it relies on advanced technology, primarily our proprietary and patented prospect management system, NewTracker®.

In lending, we believe we are a leading capital provider to SMBs and we are currently the largest non-financial institution U.S. Small Business Administration (“SBA”) licensed lender under the federal Section 7(a) loan program based on annual origination volume and the tenth largest in the country as of December 31, 2014. We originate loans through a variety of sourcing channels and, through a rigorous underwriting process, seek to achieve attractive risk-weighted returns. Our multi-faceted relationships with certain borrowers allows us to closely monitor their credit profile and take an active role in managing our investment. Further, our lending capabilities coupled with the broad outsourced business solutions of our controlled portfolio companies creates attractive cross-selling opportunities within our client base. We believe our business model creates powerful network effects which will help drive growth and operating leverage in our business. In addition, our SBA loans are structured so that the government guaranteed portion can be rapidly sold, which, coupled with our historic ability to securitize the unguaranteed portions and assuming the continuation of current market conditions, allows us to quickly recover our principal and earn excess capital on each loan, usually in less than a year. We may in the future determine to retain the government guaranteed or unguaranteed portions of loans pending deployment of excess capital.

Our proprietary and patented technology platform which we make available to our controlled portfolio companies enables them to provide our clients with a real-time management solution that organizes all of a business’s critical transaction and economic, eCommerce and website traffic data on a smartphone, tablet, laptop or personal computer. This technology provides critical consumer and marketing intelligence, including data mining, and provides a range of differentiated solutions and analytical tools that may be easily customized and integrated within their clients’ existing business processes. It also provides clients with seamless connectivity to a payment and managed technology infrastructure that is secure, fully compliant and regularly updated with the latest capabilities, services and functionalities. The platform is highly scalable to facilitate growth and meet the needs of new clients and consists solely of cloud-based offerings.
History
Newtek was formed under the laws of New York as a holding company for several wholly- and majority-owned subsidiaries. We were founded in 1998 to provide debt and equity financing to SMBs. We have since developed our branded line of business and financial products and services for the SMB market. Prior to the Conversion, we had 6 principal subsidiaries, and 30 other minor controlled entities, most of which are direct providers of financial and business services.

2

Table of Contents

Newtek Business Services Corp., a Maryland corporation, was formed in August 2013 for the purpose of reincorporating Newtek Business Services, Inc., in the state of Maryland through the Merger. As a result of the Merger, Newtek Business Services Corp assumed all of the assets and liabilities of Newtek Business Services, Inc., and in conjunction with the Merger, shares of the common stock of Newtek Business Services, Inc. were converted into shares of common stock of Newtek Business Services Corp.
Business Strategy
Key elements of our strategy to grow our business are:
Continue to focus our business model to serve the small- and medium-sized business market. We are focused on developing and marketing business and financial products and services aimed at the SMB market and on developing a recognized brand for independent business owners. Our target market represents a very significant marketplace in the United States based on non-farm private gross domestic product (“GDP”). According to statistics published by the SBA, approximately 51% of the GDP in the United States comes from small businesses and approximately 99% of businesses in the United States which have one or more employees fit into this market segment. Our business model is to get that market to view us as The Small Business Authority ® and come to depend on us as their source for business and financial services as well as the business information they need. We intend to continue to leverage the Newtek® and The Small Business Authority® brands, as well as other trademarked name brands, (The Cloud Authority, The Business Authority, The Health Insurance Authority, The IT Authority) as a one-stop-shop provider for the SMB market.
Continue to implement a strategy of acquiring customers and processing their business at low cost. We seek to acquire customers at a low cost through a national strategy centered on our alliance partners, internet marketing, coordinated marketing, social media and our NewTracker technology. Our FinTech approach to acquiring business clients is a key to our success and we believe is a more cost effective acquiring strategy than one used by our industry peers. Our alliance partners use our proprietary NewTracker referral system to refer customers to us for sales and customer tracking and processing. NewTracker distributes the referral to our appropriate business segment or segments for fulfillment while keeping our alliance partners up to date on the customer’s progress in real time with detailed documentation. We use the same proprietary system as our gateway for direct sales through our websites and our BizExec program. In addition, during 2014 we placed significant resources into direct media advertising under the banner of our The Small Business Authority mark. This ties together significant national media exposure through television and radio advertising, design and production of our “Small Business Index”™ and “SB Market Sentiment Surveys”™ reflecting our polling and assessment of business conditions for SMBs, the active use of social media marketing, and website (www.thesba.com). 
Continue to develop our state-of-the-art technology to process business applications and financial transactions. We and our controlled portfolio companies continue to update our proprietary systems to take advantage of technological advances that provide state of the art enhancements in client service and process controls which lead to lower costs. During 2012 we completed the development of the Newtek Advantage™, our Internet (or cloud) based operating platform, which has a patent pending, to integrate customer reports for all of our business services and those offered by our controlled portfolio companies in a simple, straightforward mobile application accessible by the business in real time and at any time. The current working modules offered by our controlled portfolio companies are payroll, payment processing and web traffic statistics. We and our controlled portfolio companies intend to add insurance, lending and digital financial reports, and digital tax similar to Intuit’s offering through Quickbooks.
Continue our focus on the Internet and The Small Business Authority mark. Our major goal continues to be to focus the Small Business Authority branding strategy and to establish thesba.com as the online destination spot for SMBs. Features of thesba.com that have impact on small business owners include:
Free monthly newsletters designed and written for independent, small business owners
The Small Business Authority Index™
The Small Business Authority Market Sentiment Survey
Regular news reports and updates about the economy for the small business owner
Informative and engaging SB authority informational videos

3

Table of Contents

Pertinent information on acquiring products and services for independent business owners to prosper
Continue to fulfill our obligations under the current Capco programs. Our emphasis is on continuing our exemplary regulatory compliance program in order to complete successfully the investment cycles for all Capcos. As of December 31, 2014, we have reached the final minimum investment requirements in all Capco programs in which we participated. We believe this ensures that 100% of the tax credits related to the programs are beyond risk of recapture. In addition, as of that date, all of the cash payments required to be made to the investors have been made. As the Capcos reach 100 percent investment we will seek to decertify them as Capcos, liquidate their remaining assets and thereby reduce our operational costs, particularly the legal and accounting costs associated with compliance. Six of our original Capcos have reached this stage.
We are adding to our strategy an increased emphasis on outbound telemarketing and data mining. The business we do with small and medium-sized businesses has enabled us to develop a significant and growing database of customers and we are adding key staff and devoting resources to cross-selling opportunities this presents so we can develop the full potential of our business model.
Investment Objectives as a Business Development Company
Debt Investments
We target our debt investments, which are principally made through our small business finance platform under the SBA 7(a) program, to produce a coupon rate of prime plus 2.75% which enables us to generate rapid sales of loans in the secondary market, producing gains with a yield on investment in excess of 30%. We typically structure our debt investments with the maximum seniority and collateral along with personal guarantees from portfolio company owners, in many cases collateralized by other assets including real estate. In most cases, our debt investment will be collateralized by a first lien on the assets of the portfolio company and a first or second lien on assets of guarantors, in both cases primarily real estate. All SBA loans are made with personal guarantees from any owner(s) of 20% or more of the portfolio company’s equity.
We typically structure our debt investments to include non-financial covenants that seek to minimize our risk of capital loss such as lien protection and prohibitions against change of control. Our debt investments have strong protections, including default penalties, information rights and, in some cases, board observation rights and affirmative, negative and financial covenants. Debt investments in portfolio companies, including the controlled portfolio companies, have historically and are expected to continue to comprise in excess of 95% of our overall investments in number and dollar volume.
Equity Investments
While the vast majority of our investments have been structured as debt, we have in the past and expect in the future to make selective equity investments primarily as either strategic investments to enhance the integrated operating businesses or, to a lesser degree, under the Capco programs. For investments in our controlled portfolio companies, we focus more on tailoring them to the long term growth needs of the companies than to immediate return. Our objectives with these companies is to foster the development of the businesses as a part of the integrated operational business of serving the SMB market, so we may reduce the burden on these companies to enable them to grow faster than they would otherwise as another means of supporting their development and that of the integrated whole.
In Capco investments, we often make debt investments in conjunction with being granted equity in the company in the same class of security as the business owner receives upon funding. We generally seek to structure our equity investments to provide us with minority rights provisions and event-driven put rights. We also seek to obtain limited registration rights in connection with these investments, which may include “piggyback” registration rights.
Controlled Portfolio Companies and Principal Business Segments

In addition to our debt investments in portfolio companies, either directly or through our small business finance platform, we also hold controlling interests in certain portfolio companies. Specifically, either directly or through our subsidiaries, we hold a controlling interest in Universal Processing Services of Wisconsin, LLC, d/b/a Newtek Merchant Solutions (“NMS”), CrystalTech Web Hosting, Inc. d/b/a/ Newtek Technology Solutions® (“NTS”), CDS Business Services, Inc. d/b/a Newtek Business Credit (“NBC”); Newtek Insurance Agency, LLC (“NIA”); and PMTWorks Payroll, LLC, d/b/a Newtek Payroll Services (“NPS”). We refer to these entities, collectively, as our “controlled portfolio companies.” Our controlled portfolio companies provide us with an extensive network of business relationships that supplement our referral sources and that we believe will help us to maintain a robust pipeline of lending opportunities and expand our small business finance platform.


4

Table of Contents

NMS, our “Electronic payment processing” segment, markets credit and debit card processing services, check approval services and ancillary processing equipment and software to merchants who accept credit cards, debit cards, checks and other non-cash forms of payment. As of December 31, 2014, NMS provided services to approximately 15,000 merchants. NMS’s merchant base consists of both eCommerce and brick-and-mortar clients and is principally focused on the SMB market, a segment that offers relatively attractive pricing margins and has been difficult for competitors to penetrate.

NTS, our “Managed technology solutions” segment, provides website hosting, dedicated server hosting, cloud hosting, web design and development, internet marketing, e-commerce, data storage and backup, and other related services to more than 106,000 business and customer accounts in 162 countries.

NIA serves as a retail and wholesale insurance agency specializing in the sale of commercial and health/benefits lines insurance products to the SMB market as well as various personal lines of insurance. NIA is licensed in all 50 states.

NPS offers an array of industry standard and competitively priced payroll management, payment and tax reporting services to SMBs.

NBC is a portion of our small business finance segment, offers traditional factoring and receivables purchase services to SMBs as well as back office services such as billing and cash collections.

Our controlled portfolio companies combined with our lending platform provide us with a network of business relationships that allows us to cross-sell our financing options and further establishes us as a “one-stop-shop” for SMBs

The revenues that our controlled portfolio companies generate, after deducting operational expenses, may be distributed to us. As a BDC, our board of directors will determine quarterly the fair value of our controlled portfolio companies in a similar manner as our other investments. In particular, our investments in our controlled portfolio companies are valued using a valuation methodology that incorporates both the market approach (public comparable company analysis) and the income approach (discounted cash flow analysis). In following these approaches, factors that we may take into account in fair value pricing our investments include, as relevant: available current market data, including relevant and applicable market trading comparables, the portfolio company’s earnings and discounted cash flows, comparisons of financial ratios of peer companies that are public, and enterprise values, among other factors.
Overview
The Company’s principal business segments prior to the BDC Conversion, operated in a coordinated manner in order to provide business and financial services to the SMB market, were:
Small Business Finance: This segment is comprised of Newtek Small Business Finance, LLC (“NSBF”), a subsidiary which is a nationally licensed, SBA 7(a) lender that originates, sells and services loans to qualifying small businesses, which are partially guaranteed by the SBA, and CDS Business Services, Inc. d/b/a Newtek Business Credit (NBC), which provides receivable financing, revolving lines of credit and billing management services. An additional subsidiary, Small Business Lending, Inc., is a lender service provider for third-parties that primarily services government guaranteed SBA loans and other government guaranteed loans.
Electronic Payment Processing: Marketing third party credit card processing and check approval services to the SMB market under the name of Newtek Merchant Solutions.
Managed Technology Solutions: Offers shared and dedicated web hosting, data storage and backup services, cloud computing plans and related services to the small- and medium-sized business market.
All Other: Businesses formed from investments made through Capco programs and others which cannot be aggregated with other operating segments, including NIA and payroll processing (PMT).
Corporate Activities: Corporate implements business strategy, directs marketing, provides technology oversight and guidance, coordinates and integrates activities of the segments, contracts with alliance partners, acquires customer opportunities and owns our proprietary NewTracker referral system. This segment includes revenue and expenses not allocated to other segments, including interest income, Capco management fee income and corporate operations expenses.

5

Table of Contents

Capcos: Twelve certified capital companies which invest in SMBs. The Capcos generate non-cash income from tax credits and non-cash interest and insurance expenses in addition to cash management fees and expenses.
Financial information for each segment prior to the Conversion can be found in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial Condition, Segment Results and Note 26-Segment Reporting to the Consolidated Financial Statements, below.
Small Business Finance
We originate SBA loans and offer accounts receivable financing and other lending products essential for SMBs. In addition, we provide small business loan servicing and consulting to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) and to numerous other financial institutions.
Newtek Small Business Finance, LLC (NSBF), a subsidiary which specializes in originating, servicing and selling small business loans guaranteed by the SBA for the purpose of acquiring commercial real estate, machinery, equipment and inventory and to refinance debt and fund franchises, working capital and business acquisitions. NSBF is one of 14 SBA licensed Small Business Lending Corporations (SBLC) that, along with licensed financial institutions, provide loans nationwide under the federal Section 7(a) loan program (“SBA 7(a) loans”). NSBF has received preferred lender program (PLP) status, a designation whereby the SBA authorizes the most experienced SBA lenders to place SBA guarantees on loans without seeking prior SBA review and approval. Being a national lender, PLP status allows NSBF to serve its clients in an expedited manner since it is not required to present applications to the SBA for concurrent review and approval. In December 2010, Standard & Poor’s (“S&P”) Ratings Services added NSBF to their Select Servicer List which has been helpful to the Company in obtaining additional outside servicing contracts.
We originate loans ranging from $50,000 to $5,000,000 to both startup and existing businesses, which use the funds for a wide range of business needs including:
opening, expanding or acquiring a business or franchise: $50,000 to $5,000,000;
financing working capital:
SBA term loans: at least $50,000
Purchase equipment: $25,000 to $5,000,000
purchasing owner-occupied commercial real estate and leasehold improvements: up to $5,000,000; and
refinancing existing non-real-estate business debt: $25,000 to $5,000,000.
As of December 31, 2014 we:
service over $750 million in business loans for ourselves and third parties involving over 1,600 borrowers
have created successfully created and financed five Standard & Poors-rated securitizations
increased our revolving credit facility with Capital One, North America ("Capital One"), to $50,000,000 to finance and warehouse SBA 7(a) loans; and
funded in excess of $200,000,000 in SBA 7(a) loans for the year.

Under the SBA’s 7(a) lending program, a bank or other lender such as NSBF underwrites a loan between $50,000 and $5 million for a variety of general business purposes based on the SBA’s guidelines and the SBA provides a partial guarantee on the loan. Depending on the loan size, the SBA typically guarantees between 75% and 90% of the principal and interest due. The recoveries and expenses on the unguaranteed portions of these loans are shared pari passu between the SBA and the lender, which substantially reduces the loss severity on the unguaranteed portion of a loan for all SBA 7(a) loan investors. SBA 7(a) loans are typically between seven and 25 years in maturity, are four to five years in duration and bear interest at the prime rate plus a spread from 2.25% to 2.75%. Since the guaranteed portions of SBA 7(a) loans carry the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, lenders may, and frequently do, sell the guaranteed portion of SBA 7(a) loans in the capital markets, hold the unguaranteed portion and retain all loan servicing rights.

6

Table of Contents

NSBF has a dedicated capital markets team that sells or securitizes the guaranteed and the unguaranteed portions of its SBA 7(a) loans. Historically, NSBF has sold the guaranteed portion of its originated SBA 7(a) loans within two weeks of origination and retained the unguaranteed portion until accumulating sufficient loans for a securitization. Since inception, NSBF has sold approximately $656 million of the SBA guaranteed portions of SBA 7(a) loans at premiums ranging from 106% to 120% of par value and typically any portion of the premium that was above 110% of par value was shared equally between NSBF and the SBA. In December 2010, NSBF launched its securitization program for unguaranteed portions of its SBA 7(a) loans and has since successfully completed five securitization transactions with Standard & Poor’s AA or A ratings and attractive advance rates of approximately 70% of par value. NSBF intends to do additional securitizations in the future which may be on comparable although not necessarily identical terms and conditions. We may determine to retain the government guaranteed or unguaranteed portions of loans pending deployment of excess capital
Late in 2009, we were selected by the FDIC as its contractor to manage and service portfolios of SBA 7(a) loans acquired by the FDIC from failed financial institutions. In addition, we assist the FDIC in the packaging of these loans for sale. Our existing servicing facilities and personnel perform these activities supplemented by contract workers as needed. The size of the portfolio we service for the FDIC varies and depends on the level of bank failures and the needs of the FDIC in managing portfolios acquired from those banks. On December 22, 2014, the Company’s wholly-owned portfolio company, Small Business Lending, Inc. (“SBL”), entered into a new contract (the “New Agreement”) with the FDIC, pursuant to which SBL will continue to provide the same or similar loan servicing and consulting services to the FDIC for SBA, United States Department of Agriculture and other loans acquired by the FDIC from failed banks, as it did under its previous contract with the FDIC. The New Agreement has an initial term of three (3) years, with an option in favor of the FDIC for two (2) additional three (3) year terms and one (l) additional one year term, for a total period of performance of up to ten (10) years. As of December 31, 2014, we were servicing approximately $122,000,000 in loans under this and all other third party contracts, in addition to the other approximately $631,000,000 loans originated by NSBF we service as of December 31, 2014.
Loan Securitizations: NSBF typically retains the unguaranteed portions of the loans it originates and incurs related warehouse financing costs. Beginning in December 2010 NSBF developed a process to structure loan securitization transactions enabling it to move the unguaranteed portions of loans it originates into securitization trusts and to sell debt securities issued by these trusts. The securities sold were rated AA or A by S&P. In all, in transactions in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2014, NSBF has transferred approximately $112,243,000 in unguaranteed loan portions in five transactions. With the loan securitization transactions, NSBF has been able to create significant liquidity which has been used to pay down the warehouse line and to fund new loans. The success of these securitization transactions has encouraged us to believe that we will be able to continue this process successfully as long as market and other conditions permit.
NSBF has in addition historically relied on bank financing to provide the revolving financing to support its lending activities. Currently Capital One provides a $50 million line for financing SBA guaranteed loans.
We also offer accounts receivable financing and management services through CDS Business Services, Inc. d/b/a Newtek Business Credit (NBC), another of our controlled portfolio companies. Through this service, SMBs can obtain $10,000 to $2,000,000 per month through the sale of their trade receivables or through a revolving line of credit collateralized by receivable accounts. NBC also offers back office receivables services for small businesses, such as billing and cash collections.
Small Business Lending, Inc. (SBL), has during 2014 become the focus of the Company’s efforts to expand loan servicing for third-parties in non-SBA areas.
Electronic Payment Processing
Newtek Merchant Solutions (NMS), a controlled portfolio company, markets credit and debit card processing services, check approval services and ancillary processing equipment and software to merchants who accept credit cards, debit cards, checks and other non-cash forms of payment. New merchants are acquired through several sales channels. Our primary focus is on developing new merchant sales leads as a result of internal sales efforts and our direct marketing under The Small Business Authority brand. NMS has targeted the marketing of its array of services under agreements with alliance partners, which are principally financial institutions, including banks, credit unions and other related businesses that are able to refer potential customers to NMS through Newtek’s NewTracker referral system. In addition, we enter into agreements with independent sales agents throughout the country. These referring organizations and associations are typically paid a percentage of the processing revenue derived from the respective merchants that they successfully refer to us. In 2014, we processed merchant transactions with a sales volume exceeding $4.6 billion, including merchant portfolios operated by our other subsidiaries which are serviced by NMS. Our customer base and the related sales volume processed by us has grown significantly during each year of operations since 2002 through a combination of organic growth in customers as well as selective merchant portfolio

7

Table of Contents

acquisitions. Our merchant base has grown from approximately 1,200 merchants at the end of 2002 to approximately 14,300 merchants at the end of 2014.
We maintain two main customer service and sales support offices in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Brownsville, Texas with additional specialists located in Phoenix, Arizona and New York. Our personnel at these locations assist merchants with initial installation of equipment and on-going service, as well as any other special processing needs that they may have.
Because we are not a bank, we are unable to belong to and directly access the Visa® and MasterCard® bankcard associations and we must be sponsored by a bank in order to process bankcard transactions. We are currently registered with Visa® and MasterCard® through the sponsorship of two banks that are members of the card associations, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. and, since January 2011 Redwood Merchant Services, a division of WestAmerica Bank.
Our electronic payment processing business relies on our ability to obtain data processing services. There are two aspects to the processing of payments: the initial authorization of a payment (referred to as the “front-end processing”) and the merchant credit and cardholder charge transaction (the “back end processing”). In 2009, we signed agreements with Wells Fargo Bank to diversify our processing operations and with First Data Corporation to reduce our costs. We contract with several large-scale data processing companies to provide the front-end and back-end processing (Chase Paymentech Solutions, LLC, First Data Merchant Services Corporation (multiple platforms), Total Systems Services, Inc. and National Processing Company); these multiple platforms allow us to compete more effectively, reduce our risk of reliance on any one source, and give us the option of utilizing different processors to match the needs of particular merchants or situations. As our merchant base has grown, we believe that we have been able to achieve greater economies of scale in terms of negotiating the cost structure for providing such settlement services.
We continue to work with an affiliate, The Secure Gateway Services, LLC, which has the software and experience to provide a processing gateway facility for our payment processing business. This has resulted in increased integration of customer payment processing data with our Newtek Advantage software platform providing a mobile application allowing the customer to monitor charge processing activity in real time.
As a result of our exposure to liability for merchant fraud, charge-backs and other losses inherent in the merchant payment processing business, we have developed practices and policies which attempt to assess and reduce these risks. Activities in which we engage in order to mitigate such risks are:
underwriting the initial application of a merchant to identify unusual risks, structuring the relationship in a manner consistent with acceptable risks and, where possible, obtaining a personal or parent corporation guarantee from the merchant;
monitoring the daily and monthly activity of each merchant to identify any departures from normative charging behavior of each merchant and monitoring the largest of our merchants and those with high levels of refunds or charge-backs, so as to ensure an opportunity to address any credit or charge-back liability problems at the earliest possible time; and
requiring, when appropriate, merchants to agree to the establishment of cash reserves to protect NMS against merchant failures to pay for charge-backs and other fees, and making adjustments in these reserves as merchant experience indicates.
Our development and growth are focused on selling our services to internally generated referrals, merchant referrals identified for us by our alliance partners, and, with additional emphasis since January 2013, by our independent sales representatives. We are still different than most electronic payment processing companies who acquire their clients primarily through independent agents. We believe that our business model provides us with a competitive advantage by enabling NMS to acquire new electronic payment processing merchants at a lower cost level for third-party commissions than the industry average. Our business model allows NMS to own the customer as well as the stream of residual payments, as opposed to models which rely more heavily on independent sales agents. Since 2013 we have devoted resources to the design and testing of systems to allow us to offer to our merchant customers, state of the art technology in meeting the expected future requirements of the card associations for the implementation of the Europay, MasterCard, Visa (“EMV”) smart card technology. This is a global standard for interactive, integrated circuit cards and related point of sale terminals that will use cards imbedded with computer readable chips. We believe that this standard, which has been adopted in many areas outside the United States, will be implemented in the U.S. and we are positioning NMS to be a leader or authority in this field. In doing this we have the benefit of our affiliated technology companies who are able to provide the technological expertise needed for this project.

8

Table of Contents

Managed Technology Solutions
Through our subsidiary, CrystalTech Web Hosting, Inc. d/b/a/ Newtek Technology Services® (NTS), we provide website hosting, dedicated server hosting, cloud hosting, web design and development, internet marketing, ecommerce, data storage and backup, and other related services to more than 106,000 customer accounts in 100 countries.
NTS provides a full suite of outsourced IT infrastructure services, including shared server hosting, dedicated server hosting, and cloud server (virtual) instances under the Newtek Technology Services®, Newtek Web Services®, Newtek Web Hosting, and CrystalTech® brands, for which it receives recurring monthly fees, as well as other fees such as set-up fees, consulting fees, domain name registration fees, among others. Ninety percent of all fees are paid in advance by credit card.
NTS has recognized the continuing decline in Microsoft being utilized in the design of web sites and the market shift to Linux, Nginx and a proliferation of Word Press sites being built on non-Microsoft based platforms. This decline has caused a marked downward trend in the historical site count of NTS hosted sites. NTS has responded by launching Linux Apache and Linux Nginx platforms within its environment and created associated control panels, service/support and billing to participate more fully in the market as compared to the present 33% of the new web design growth represented by Microsoft. All platforms are available within NTS’s Cloud and non-cloud environment and are fully managed offerings as compared to our competitors. In addition, Newtek has created a proprietary platform and filed an associated patent for Newtek Advantage which leverages NTS’s underlying technologies to deliver real time information and actionable business intelligence to its existing and new customer base.
NTS has launched a complete line of cloud based business and eCommerce packages to streamline the decision process for business owners and accommodate designers and developers that wish to build sites in both Microsoft and Linux environments. NTS’s Cloud offerings provide for a consumption-based hosting model that allows customers to pay only for the resources they need, which not only saves them money compared to traditional server hosting, but also enables them to scale larger or smaller on demand.
NTS delivers services not just to customers seeking hosting, but also to wholesalers, resellers and web developers by offering a range of tools for them to build, resell and deliver their web content. NTS primarily uses the Microsoft Windows® 2012 R2 platform to power its technology. NTS currently operates a 5,000 square foot fortress-strength data center located in Scottsdale, Arizona, utilizing redundant networking, electrical and back-up systems, affording customers what management believes to be a state-of-the-art level of performance and security. NTS is PCI certified, SSAE 16 (Service Organization Control 1 “SOC 1”) audited, all of which mean that it meets the highest industry standards for data security.
Throughout its operations as a Newtek portfolio company, over seventy percent of new NTS customers have come as a result of referrals without material expenditures by for marketing or advertising. Many of NTS’s competitors are very price sensitive, offering minimal services at cut-rate pricing. While being cost competitive with most Linux- and Windows-based web hosting services, NTS has emphasized higher quality uptime, service and support as well as multiple control panel environments for the designer and developer community.
NTS has diversified its product offerings to SMBs under different brands, all under Newtek Technology Services, including Newtek Hosting, Newtek Web Services, Newtek Data Storage® and Newtek Web Design and Development®. NTS focuses specifically on select markets such as restaurants, financial institutions, medical practices, law firms, accountants, retail and technology service providers for channel business and reselling. NTS has also launched a turnkey hosting service to meet financial institution needs for dedicated servers, hosting and/or data storage, enabling these entities to comply with strict regulatory requirements that demand very high security protocols and practices be in place.
NTS differentiates itself from its larger cloud hosting competitors, such as Amazon, Google and Microsoft, by offering what we believe these competitors cannot and yet is the one element absolutely critical to SMBs: a live person, available 24/7/365 to answer questions, address needs or problems with software or hardware. We have continued to add to our resources to ensure that our customers have access to the high quality support they need for the features, functions and services of their internal IT operations.
All Other: Insurance and Payroll Processing Services
We offer small business insurance products and services through Newtek Insurance Agency, LLC (“NIA”), which is licensed in 50 states. NIA serves as a retail and wholesale insurance agency specializing in the sale of personal, commercial and health/benefits lines insurance products to customers of all our affiliated companies as well as our alliance partners. We offer insurance products from multiple insurance carriers providing a wide range of choice for our customers. We have formed a

9

Table of Contents

strategic alliance with American International Group, CTAA, Navy Federal Credit Union, Credit Union National Association, Pershing and others to provide agent services to small business clients. We are continuing our efforts to implement programs with alliance partners to market commercial and personal insurance. In December 2012, NIA working with another of our companies acquired a portfolio of insurance business from a major health care insurance agency based in the New York City area. This has added approximately 340 group health insurance policies that we are servicing and will form the basis on which we plan to grow this aspect of the insurance business. We expect also that recent health care legislation will increase the demand for these services among SMBs.
We have placed significant emphasis on developing the business conducted by our controlled portfolio company operating under the trade name of “Newtek Payroll Services.” This investment was originally made in 2010, and enables the Company to offer an array of industry standard and very competitively priced payroll management, payment and tax reporting services to SMBs. Based in New York, Newtek Payroll Services has built up its business during 2014 to approximately 470 customerss with total payroll under management of approximately 3,512 employees, of which approximately 10% were Newtek employees. These payroll services are being marketed through all of our available channels including the alliance partnerships and our direct marketing campaigns.
Corporate Activities
Corporate implements business strategy, directs marketing, provides technology oversight and guidance, coordinates and integrates activities of the segments, contracts with alliance partners, acquires customer opportunities and owns our proprietary NewTracker referral system and all other intellectual property rights. This segment includes revenue and expenses not allocated to other segments, including interest income, Capco management fee income and corporate operations expenses.
Certified Capital Companies
We have deemphasized our Capco business in favor of growing our portfolio companies and do not anticipate creating any new Capcos. While observing all requirements of the Capco programs and, in particular, financing qualified businesses meeting applicable state requirements as to limitations on the proportion of ownership of qualified businesses, we have been able to use this funding source as a means to facilitate the growth of our businesses, which are strategically focused on providing goods and services to small businesses such as those in which our Capcos invest. We continue to invest in and lend to small businesses through our existing Capcos and meet the goals of the Capco programs.
Marketing
Overview
We position ourselves as a provider of business and financial services to the SMB sector in the United States. Through integrated marketing and sales of each service line we control our customer’s experience in order to provide high quality service to both our marketing partners and potential customers. We reach potential customers through our multi-channel approach featuring direct, indirect and direct outbound solicitation efforts.
Although we continue to utilize and grow our core marketing channel of strategic alliance partners, we have initiated a direct marketing strategy to the SMB customers through our new “go to market” brand, “The Small Business Authority.” Through this brand we are establishing ourselves as the authority in each of the service lines our portfolio companies provide through a coordinated radio and television advertising campaign built around our new web presence, www.thesba.com. We continue to market through our bilingual 24/7 call center which we believe is a valuable feature for most small business owners that need help during non-business hours and on weekends. We use web-based applications as an in-house tool to help our employees and associates to be efficient, smart and productive. Instead of using expensive, six-figured salaried employees that a typical bank or an insurance agency would use to market financial products and business services to SMB customers, we use technology and dedicated loyal non-executive-salary-plus-bonus employees. The addition of the direct to market strategy through promotion of our new web site supports our goal to maintain costs and retain greater margin on each transaction as well as providing our competent in house business service specialists the ability to create a second and third product and service opportunities.
We believe that our business service specialists on all product lines understand the needs of the SMB owner. Each business service specialists in the enterprise has completed our “Newtek University” which provides in depth training and techniques in identifying qualified opportunities across all of our portfolio companies' service offerings. We conduct telephone interviews and targeted surveys with our customers across all product lines to deepen our understanding of their needs. We have tailored our procedures so our SMB customers do not have to fill out multiple handwritten forms or type multiple data entry screens,

10

Table of Contents

which we believe is the most aggravating factor facing our customers. We have modeled our back-office and business operations after customer centered operational models. We stress our responsive customer service and we endeavor to excel in addressing and resolving issues and problems that our customers may face. We are now providing our 24/7 customer service functions in Spanish as well as English to service the growing Hispanic-owned and -operated SMB customer base in the United States.
We also market our portfolio companies' services through referrals from our alliance partners such as AIG, Amalgamated Bank, Credit Union National Association, Iberia Bank, Pershing, New York Community Bank, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, ENT Federal Credit Union, Randolph Brooks Federal Credit Union and Nassau Educators Federal Credit Union using our proprietary NewTracker referral system as well as direct referrals from our new web presence, www.thesba.com. Additional referrals are obtained from individual professionals in geographic markets that have signed up to provide referrals and earn commissions through our BizExec and TechExec Programs. These individuals are traditionally information technology professionals, CPAs, independent insurance agents and sales and/or marketing professionals. In addition, electronic payment processing services are marketed through independent sales representatives and web technology and ecommerce services are marketed through internet-based marketing and third-party resellers. A common thread across all business lines relates to acquiring customers at low cost. We seek to bundle our marketing efforts through our brand, our portal, our proprietary NewTracker technology, our new web presence as The Small Business Authority and one easy entry point of contact.
We have implemented a multi-channel marketing strategy that consists of:
Direct: The goal of the Newtek website, www.thesba.com, is to focus on helping business owners succeed by providing them high quality business services, testimonials, case studies and a daily blog. In addition, the site delivers promotions to aid in acquiring clients and creating higher levels of customer referrals. The website is consistent with Newtek’s national television campaign and on-line messaging, positioning it as a national provider of business services and financial products to the more than 27 million small and independently owned and operated businesses across the United States.
To supplement our direct marketing efforts, we have developed two proprietary vehicles to enhance the visibility and credibility of The Small Business Authority and the related website thesba.com. The Small Business Index was developed internally and trademarked during 2011. It is a monthly assessment of various factors indicative of business conditions in the small business market. Since its introduction, it has received a great deal of publicity and is now quoted in numerous national publications. In addition, we also publish our internally developed SB Market Sentiment Survey, which captures responses from our website visitors on topics of significant importance to our small business customers. This survey has also gained much national attention. We believe that both of these efforts add significantly to our marketing efforts and further support our efforts to become the one-stop-shop for all SMBs.
A final addition to our direct marketing efforts is our effort to give The Small Business Authority a social media presence. We have dedicated staff familiar with the latest developments in social media and we have been active in placing blog articles, videos and special promotions on numerous social media sites. We distribute this type of content multiple times daily and attempt to engage with customers and others on a similar basis. Our staff follows numerous blog sites related to our businesses and attempts to post relevant materials and information that both addresses small and medium sized business needs and interests and identifies the ways in which The Small Business Authority can address many of those needs.
Indirect: Our alliance partners market one or more of our services to their customer base or members, and utilize NewTracker to submit referrals to Newtek from either their website or directly by their staff. Through our BizExec and TechExec Programs, we are recruiting individual professionals such as insurance agents, lawyers and accountants, or website designers or software developers, who utilize NewTracker through a link to NewTracker from their own site or the establishment of a new website.
Direct Outbound: We combined all data assets into a seamless, enterprise-wide, accessible master database in order to facilitate cross marketing, selling and servicing, real-time data mining and business intelligence. We have established a dedicated team to use our master database for cross marketing, selling and servicing.
The Newtek Referral System
Our patented NewTracker® referral system, allows us to process new business utilizing a web-based, centralized processing point. In-bound referrals from alliance partners, our website and other sources are transmitted to our businesses to provide the service or services our customers need. Our trained representatives use these web-based applications as a tool to acquire and process data through telephonic interviews, eliminating the need for face-to-face contact and the requirement that a customer complete multiple paper forms or data entry for multiple product lines. This approach is customer friendly, allows us to process applications very efficiently and allows us to store client information for further processing and cross-selling efforts while

11

Table of Contents

offering what we believe to be the highest level of customer service. It also assures our alliance partners full transaction transparency. This system permits our alliance partners to have a window to our back office processing 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to see every communication and interaction between our sales and processing representatives and their referred customers while still preserving the privacy of customer or alliance partner sensitive data on the application. NewTracker enables the processing and tracking of services in a manner similar to the bar code system used by overnight delivery services. We believe that NewTracker is a key differentiating component of our business. It enables us to scale our business services rapidly to meet the demands of our customers. NewTracker enables our alliance partners to offer our services immediately, without having to invest in marketing materials, sales and marketing personnel, training, licensing or office space. Because their customers or members are driven by our technology to our processing centers, which can handle increased volume of transactions without having to add specialized staff or infrastructure, there is no need for additional investment by our alliance partners. NewTracker additionally provides direct interface to business owners/operators accessing our new web site as they provide basic information regarding their need so that our Business Service Specialists can immediately respond to inquiry for any of our service offerings. The Company is also beginning to explore the possibility of marketing some aspect of the patented technology as it represents a unique capability for sales organizations as it not only manages intake of business but enables real time management of client service functions.
Alliances
Each of the portfolio companies benefit from the receipt of significant numbers of customer referrals from our alliance partners, pursuant to agreements negotiated and structured by our holding company management and staff. We are focused on using strategic business affiliations to identify likely SMB customers and others to be serviced by our operating businesses. We seek to ally Newtek with companies and organizations that wish to offer one or more of our portfolio companies' business lines to their customers or members. We provide one-stop shopping for alliance partners that want to launch or expand their business services. For example, many credit unions are serving small business owners with consumer lending applications, but can use our alliance with Credit Union National Association and scores of small to large credit unions and community banks to expand their offering of services. We are also able to private label any of our business services for any alliance partner.
These alliance partners are able to provide greater service to their customers and members and derive a steady flow of referral payments from us. On the other hand, our operating companies are receiving significant numbers of referrals for our services in the areas of small business loans, insurance and electronic payment processing and are thus acquiring customers at a low cost. NewTracker, our proprietary, internally developed referral system technology, facilitates this transfer of information and also permits our customer service representatives, their supervisors and the referring alliance partners to observe the real-time processing of each referral, from intake to completion. For example, an alliance partner financial advisor who refers a brokerage customer for electronic payment processing, can track our processing of their client and know when decisions are made, what they are, when the referral fees are earned, as well as observe and oversee the operational performance of our customer service representatives. The process is analogous to the bar code system used by overnight delivery services to track the movement of a package, where critical processing points are input and the customer is able to access the company’s password-protected web site and monitor the movement of the package from pick-up to delivery.
We have entered into agreements to provide one or more business services with numerous national and regional businesses or organizations including, but not limited to:
 
Morgan Stanley Smith Barney
New York Community Bank
Credit Union National Association (CUNA)
Microsoft
American International Group
Pershing
Members 1st Federal Credit Union
Ent Federal Credit Union

12

Table of Contents

IBERIABANK
Bellco Credit Union
Wright Patt Credit Union
SpaceCoast Credit Union
Nassau Educators Federal Credit Union
Randolph Brooks Federal Credit Union
Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Brownsville (TX) Chamber of Commerce
Intellectual Property
Newtek has developed patented software which is the core of its NewTracker referral system.
NTS uses specialized software to conduct its business under a perpetual, royalty-free license from its developer, the former owner of CrystalTech, acquired at the time of our acquisition of the business.
We and our controlled portfolio companies have several trademarks and service marks, all of which are of material importance to us. The following trademarks and service marks are the subject of trademark registrations issued by the USPTO:
1.
AT NEWTEK, WE DO IT BETTER
2.
BIZEXEC
3.
CRYSTALTECH
4.
 CRYSTALTECH WEB HOSTING
5.
CT & Design
6.
 NEWTEK
7.
NEWTEK BIZEXEC
8.
NEWTEK BUSINESS SERVICES
9.
NEWTEK BUSINESS SOLUTIONS
10.
NEWTEK + NEWT LOGO
11.
NEWTEK REFERRAL SYSTEM
12.
NEWTEK TECHNOLOGY SERVICES
13.
NEWTEK WEB SERVICES
14.
NEWTRACKER
15.
WEBCONTROLCENTER
16.
NEWTEK BUSINESS CREDIT
17.
NEWTEK DATA STORAGE

13

Table of Contents

18.
NEWTEK WEB DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
19.
NEWTEK WEB HOSTING
20.
WE DO IT BETTER
21.
A NEW WAY TO THINK ABOUT SMALL-BUSINESS IT
22.
THE CLOUD AUTHORITY
23.
THESBA.COM THE SMALL BUSINESS AUTHORITY POWERED BY NEWTEK
24.
THE SMALL BUSINESS AUTHORITY
25.
THE SMALL BUSINESS AUTHORITY HOUR
26.
NEWTPAY PRO
27.
NEWTPAY
28.
NEWTEK BUSINESS SERVICES, INC. + NEWT LOGO
29.
THE CLOUD AUTHORITY + DESIGN
30.
THESBA
31.
THE SBAUTHORITY INDEX
32.
THE SMALL BUSINESS AUTHORITY INDEX
33.
THESBA INDEX
34.
NEWTEK SITECENTER
35.
NEWTEK PAYROLL
36.
CONTINUOUS CYBER SECURITY SCANNING
37.
THE BUSINESS AUTHORITY
38.
CLOUD AUTHORITY
39.
INSURED CLOUD COMPUTING
40.
THE PAYROLL AUTHORITY
41.
THE ECOMMERCE AUTHORITY
42.
THE MOBILE APPLICATION AUTHORITY
43.
THE HEALTH INSURANCE AUTHORITY
44.
THE IT AUTHORITY
45.
NEWTEK ADVANTAGE
46.
NEWTEK HOSTING
47.
NEWTPAY MOBILE

14

Table of Contents

48.
THESBA.COM THE SMALL BUSINESS AUTHORITY

The following trademarks and service marks are the subject of pending trademark applications filed with the USPTO:
1.
NEWTEK INSURED CLOUD COMPUTING
2.
NEWTEK INSURED HOSTING
3.
NEWTEK INSURED PAYROLL
4.
THE SMALL BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY AUTHORITY
5.
THE TECHNOLOGY AUTHORITY
6.
NEWTEK INSURED ECOMMERCE
7.
NEWTEK INSURED MERCHANT SERVICES
8.
NEWTEK EDGE
9.
THE TECH AUTHORITY
10.
NEWTPAY- ECOMMERCE
11.
NEWTPAY- EMV
12.
NEWTPAY- POS
13.
NEWTPAY FREE PAYMENT PROCESSING
14.
NEWTPAY ZERO
15.
THE INSURANCE AND BENEFITS AUTHORITY
16.
THE SMALL BUSINESS INSURANCE AUTHORITY
Government Regulation
Overview
Newtek’s electronic payment processing, lending and insurance portfolio companies and/or subsidiaries, and Capco operations, are subject to regulation by federal, state and professional governing bodies. In addition, our financial institution customers, which include commercial banks and credit unions, operate in markets that are subject to rigorous regulatory oversight and supervision. The compliance of our products and services with these requirements depends on a variety of factors including the particular functionality, the interactive design and the charter or license of the financial institution. Our financial services customers must independently assess and determine what is required of them under these regulations and are responsible for ensuring that our systems and the design of their websites conform to their regulatory obligations. New laws or regulations are frequently adopted in these areas that require constant compliance and could increase our costs.
Certified Capital Companies
In return for the Capcos making investments in the targeted companies, the states provide tax credits, generally equal to funds invested in the Capco by the insurance companies that provide the funds to the Capcos. In order to maintain its status as a Capco and to avoid recapture or forfeiture of the tax credits, each Capco must meet a number of specific investment requirements, including a minimum investment schedule all of which have been met prior to required dates by all of our Capcos. As a result, we believe there is no basis for a loss of tax credits.
Each of the state Capco programs has a requirement that a Capco, in order to maintain its certified status, must meet certain investment requirements, both qualitative and quantitative, all of which the Company’s Capcos have met. These include limitations on the initial size of the recipients of the Capco funds, including the number of their employees, the location within

15

Table of Contents

the respective state of the recipients and the recipients’ commitment to remain therein for a specified period of time, the types of business conducted by the recipients, and the terms of the investments in the recipients.
The states of Louisiana, Colorado and Texas and the state of New York have added to their Capco programs limitations on the equity investment Capcos can make in qualified businesses. These programs or program changes seek to preclude a Capco from owning all or a majority of the voting equity of the invested business. While Newtek has made profitable majority-owned investments in the past, we have also made minority or passive investments in qualified businesses. Newtek’s Capcos are in full compliance with all investment limitations, and management foresees no significant difficulty in continuing to remain in compliance.
When each of Newtek’s Capcos has invested in qualified businesses an amount equal to 100% of its initial certified capital, it is able to decertify (terminate its status as a Capco) and no longer be subject to any state Capco regulation. Upon voluntary decertification, the programs in about half of the states require that a Capco share any distributions to its equity holders with the state sponsoring the Capco. For those states that require a share of distributions, the sharing percentages vary, but are generally from 10 to 30%, usually on distributions above a specified internal rate of return for the equity owners of the Capco. States not requiring distributions are Texas and New York (Programs 1, 2 and 3). At this time, Newtek does not believe that the sharing requirements will have a material impact on the company’s financial condition or operations. Three of Newtek’s Capcos have reached the 100% investment level and a fourth, our Wisconsin based Capco, met its statutory requirements and voluntarily decertified and was subsequently dissolved. While the Company continues to attempt to achieve full (100%) investment in all of its Capcos, circumstances of individual programs may make this unachievable. If and when such an event arises, the Capco and the Company will evaluate alternatives and may seek to dissolve the Capco as permitted under the particular program. Such an event would represent a failure of the Capco but would not carry with it any financial consequences to the Company.

Managerial Assistance
 
A BDC must have been organized and have its principal place of business in the United States and must be operated for the purpose of making investments in the types of securities described above. However, in order to count portfolio securities as qualifying assets for the purpose of the 70% test (described below), the BDC must either control the issuer of the securities or must offer to make available to the issuer of the securities (other than small and solvent companies described below) significant managerial assistance; except that, where the BDC purchases such securities in conjunction with one or more other persons acting together, one of the other persons in the group may make available such managerial assistance. Making available significant managerial assistance means, among other things, any arrangement whereby the BDC, through its directors, officers or employees, offers to provide, and, if accepted, does so provide, significant guidance and counsel concerning the management, operations or business objectives and policies of a portfolio company through monitoring of portfolio company operations, selective participation in board and management meetings, consulting with and advising a portfolio company’s officers or other organizational or financial guidance.

We do not receive fees for these services, though we may allocate direct expenses related to providing such services to the portfolio companies.
Employees
As of December 31, 2014, we and our controlled portfolio companies collectively had a total of 335 employees, of which 329 were full-time employees. We believe our labor relations are good; none of our employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement.
Confidentiality Agreements
All our employees have signed confidentiality agreements, and it is our standard practice to require newly hired employees and, when appropriate, independent consultants, to execute confidentiality agreements. These agreements provide that the employee or consultant may not use or disclose confidential information except in the performance of his or her duties for the Company, or in other limited circumstances. The steps taken by us may not, however, be adequate to prevent the misappropriation of our proprietary rights or technology.
Revenues and Assets by Geographic Area
During the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, virtually all of our revenue was derived from customers in the United States, although we provide pre-paid web site hosting services to customers in approximately 162 countries.

16

Table of Contents

Available Information
We are subject to the informational requirements of the Securities Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and in accordance with those requirements file reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. You may read and copy the reports, proxy statements and other information that we file with the SEC under the informational requirements of the Securities Exchange Act at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 450 Fifth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20549. Please call 1-800-SEC-0339 for information about the SEC’s Public Reference Room. The SEC also maintains a web site that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding registrants that file electronically with the SEC. The address of the SEC’s web site is http://www.sec.gov. Our principal offices are located at 212 West 35th Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY, 10001 and our telephone number is (212) 356-9500. Our website may be directly accessed at http://www.thesba.com. We make available through our website, free of charge, our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. These documents may be directly accessed at http://investor.newtekbusinessservices.com Information contained on our website is not a part of this report.
Competition
 
We compete to provide financing to small and medium sized businesses with other BDCs, as well as traditional financial services companies such as commercial banks and other financing sources. Some of our competitors are larger and have greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources than we have. We believe we compete effectively with these entities primarily on the basis of the experience, industry knowledge and expertise of our senior lending team. We offer a variety of attractive financing sources, as well as cost effective and efficient business services, to meet capital needs through our subsidiaries and controlled portfolio companies. For additional information concerning our competitive position and competitive risks, see “Item 1A - Risk Factors.” 
We and our portfolio companies compete in a large number of markets for the sale of services to SMBs. Each of our controlled portfolio companies competes not only against suppliers in its particular state or region of the country but also against suppliers operating on a national or even a multi-national scale. None of the markets in which our portfolio companies compete are dominated by a small number of companies that could materially alter the terms of the competition.
Our Electronic payment processing portfolio company, NMS competes with entities including Heartland Payment Systems, First National Bank of Omaha, Jetpay Corporation (formerly Universal Business Payment Solutions) and Paymentech, L.P. Our Web hosting portfolio company competes with 1&1, Hosting.com, Discount ASP, Maxum ASP, GoDaddy®, Yahoo!®, BlueHost®, iPowerWeb®, Rackspace.com, Web.com, Endurance International Group (EIGI) and Microsoft Live among others. Our Small Business Finance subsidiary, NSBF competes with regional and national banks and non-bank lenders. Intuit® is bundling electronic payment processing, web hosting and payroll services similar to ours in offerings that compete in the same small- to midsize-business market.
In many cases, we believe the competitors of our portfolio companies and subsidiaries are not as able as we are to take advantage of changes in business practices due to technological developments and, for those with a larger size, are unable to offer the personalized service that many small business owners and operators seem to want.
While we compete with many different providers in our various businesses, we have been unable to identify any direct and comprehensive competitors that deliver the same broad suite of services focused on the needs of the SMB market with the same marketing strategy as we do. Some of our competitive advantages include:
Our compatible products such as our e-commerce offerings that we are able to bundle to increase sales, reduce costs and reduce risks for our customers and enable us to sell two, three, or four products at the same time;
Our proprietary NewTracker referral system, which allows us to process new business utilizing a web-based, centralized processing point and provides back end scalability;
Our focus on developing and marketing business services and financial products and services aimed at the small- and medium-sized business market;
Our scalability, which allows us to size our business services capabilities very quickly to meet customer and market needs;

17

Table of Contents

Our ability to offer personalized service and competitive rates;
A strategy of multiple channel distribution, which gives us maximum exposure in the marketplace;
High quality customer service 24x7x365 across all business lines, with a focus primarily on absolute customer service;
Our telephonic interview process, as opposed to requiring handwritten or data-typing processes, which allows us to offer high levels of customer service and satisfaction, particularly for small business owners who do not get this service from our competitors; and
Our NewTracker Portal, which allows our alliance partners to offer a centralized access point for their small- to medium-sized business clients as part of their larger strategic approach to marketing and allows such partners to demonstrate that they are focused on providing a suite of services to the small business market in addition to their core service.
Competitive Advantages

We believe that we are well positioned to take advantage of investment opportunities in SMBs due to the following
competitive advantages:
Internally Managed Structure and Significant Management Resources. We are internally managed by our executive officers under the supervision of our board of directors and do not depend on an external investment advisor. As a result, we do not pay investment advisory fees and all of our income is available to pay our operating costs, which include employing investment and portfolio management professionals, and to make distributions to our stockholders. We believe that our internally managed structure provides us with a lower cost operating expense structure, when compared to other publicly traded and privately-held investment firms which are externally managed, and allows us the opportunity to leverage our non-interest operating expenses as we grow our investment portfolio. Our senior lending team has developed one of the largest independent loan origination and servicing platforms that focuses exclusively on SMBs.
Business Model Enables Attractive Risk-Weighted Return on Investment in SBA Lending. Our loans are structured so as to permit rapid sale of the U.S. government guaranteed portions, often within weeks of origination, and the unguaranteed portions have been successfully securitized, usually within a year of origination. The return of principal and premium may result in a very advantageous risk-weighted return on our original investment in each loan. We may determine to retain the government guaranteed or unguaranteed portions of loans pending deployment of excess capital.
State of the Art Technology. Our patented NewTracker® software enables us to board a SMB customer, process the application or inquiry, assemble necessary documents, complete the transaction and create a daily reporting system that is sufficiently unique as to receive a U.S. patent. This system enables us to identify a transaction, similar to a merchandise barcode or the customer management system used by SalesForce.com, then process the business transaction and generate internal reports used by management and external reports for strategic referral partners. It allows our referral partners to have digital access into our back office and follow on a real time, 24/7 basis the processing of their referred customers. This technology has been made applicable to all of the service and product offerings we make directly or through our controlled portfolio companies.
Established Direct Origination Platform with Extensive Deal Sourcing Infrastructure. We have established a direct origination pipeline for investment opportunities without the necessity for investment banks or brokers as well as broad marketing channels that allow for highly selective underwriting. Over the past twelve years, the combination of our brand, our portal, our patented NewTracker® technology, and our new web presence as The Small Business Authority® have created an extensive deal sourcing infrastructure. Although we pay fees for loan originations that are referred to us by our alliance partners, our non-commissioned investment team works directly with the borrower to assemble and underwrite loans. We rarely invest in pre-assembled loans that are sold by investment banks or brokers. As a result, we believe that our unique national origination platform allows us to originate attractive credits at a low cost. We anticipate that our principal source of investment opportunities will continue to be in the same types of SMBs to which we currently provide financing. Our executive committee and senior lending team will also seek to leverage their extensive network of additional referral sources, including law firms, accounting firms, financial, operational and strategic consultants and financial institutions, with whom we have completed investments. Our current infrastructure

18

Table of Contents

and expansive relationships should continue to enable us to review a significant amount of high quality, direct (or non-brokered) investment opportunities.
Experienced Senior Lending Team with Proven Track Record. We believe that our senior lending team is one of the leading capital providers to SMBs. Our senior lending team has expertise in managing the SBA process and has managed a diverse portfolio of investments with a broad geographic and industry mix. While our primary focus is to expand the debt financing activities of NSBF in SBA 7(a) loans, our executive committee also has substantial experience in making debt and equity investments through our Capcos.
Flexible, Customized Financing Solutions for Seasoned, Smaller Businesses. While our primary focus as a BDC is to expand NSBF’s lending by providing SBA 7(a) loans to SMBs, we also seek to offer SMBs a variety of attractive financing structures, as well as cost effective and efficient business services, to meet their capital needs through our subsidiaries and controlled portfolio companies. Unlike many of our competitors, we believe we have the platform to provide a complete package of service and financing options for SMBs, which allows for cross-selling opportunities and improved client retention. We expect that a large portion of our capital will be loaned to companies that need growth capital, acquisition financing or funding to recapitalize or refinance existing debt facilities. Our lending continues to focus on making loans to SMBs that:
have 3 to 10 years of operational history;
significant experience in management;
credit worthy owners who provide a personal guarantee for our investment;
show a strong balance sheet including primarily real estate to collateralize our investments; and
show sufficient cash flow to be able to service the payments on our investments comfortably.

We generally seek to avoid investing in high-risk, early-stage enterprises that are only beginning to develop their market share or build their management and operational infrastructure with limited collateral.

We pursue rigorous due diligence of all prospective investments originated through our platform. Our senior lending team has developed an extensive underwriting due diligence process, which includes a review of the operational, financial, legal and industry performance and outlook for the prospective investment, including quantitative and qualitative stress tests, review of industry data and consultation with outside experts regarding the creditworthiness of the borrower. These processes continue during the portfolio monitoring process, when we conduct field examinations, review all compliance certificates and covenants and regularly assess the financial and business conditions and prospects of portfolio companies. We are also a Standard & Poor’s rated servicer for commercial loans and our exceptional servicing capabilities with a compact timeline for loan resolutions and dispositions has attracted various third-party portfolios.

Regulation
 
We have elected to be regulated as a BDC under the 1940 Act and we intend to elect to be treated, and qualify annually thereafter, as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, beginning with our 2015 taxable year. As with other companies regulated by the 1940 Act, a BDC must adhere to certain substantive regulatory requirements. The 1940 Act contains prohibitions and restrictions relating to transactions between BDCs and their affiliates (including any investment advisers or sub-advisers), principal underwriters and affiliates of those affiliates or underwriters. The 1940 Act also requires that a majority of the directors of the BDC be persons other than “interested persons,” as that term is defined in the 1940 Act. In addition, the 1940 Act provides that we may not change the nature of our business so as to cease to be, or to withdraw our election as, a BDC unless approved by “a majority of our outstanding voting securities” as defined in the 1940 Act. A majority of the outstanding voting securities of a company is defined under the 1940 Act as the lesser of: (i) 67% or more of such company’s outstanding voting securities present at a meeting if more than 50% of the outstanding voting securities of such company are present and represented by proxy or (ii) more than 50% of the outstanding shares of such company. Our bylaws provide for the calling of a special meeting of stockholders at which such action could be considered upon written notice of not less than ten or more than sixty days before the date of such meeting.
 
We may invest up to 100% of our assets in securities acquired directly from issuers in privately negotiated transactions. With respect to such securities, we may, for the purpose of public resale, be deemed an “underwriter” as that term is defined in the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act. Our intention is to not write (sell) or buy put or call options to manage

19

Table of Contents

risks associated with the publicly traded securities of our portfolio companies, except that we may enter into hedging transactions to manage the risks associated with interest rate fluctuations to the extent that we are permitted to engage in such hedging transactions under the 1940 Act and applicable commodities laws. We may also purchase or otherwise receive warrants to purchase the common stock of our portfolio companies in connection with acquisition financing or other investments. Similarly, in connection with an acquisition, we may acquire rights to require the issuers of acquired securities or their affiliates to repurchase them under certain circumstances. At December 31, 2014, we hold no investments in publicly traded securities. As a BDC, we are generally required to meet an asset coverage ratio, defined under the 1940 Act as the ratio of our gross assets (less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities) to our outstanding senior securities, of at least 200% after each issuance of senior securities.
 
We may also be prohibited under the 1940 Act from knowingly participating in certain transactions with our affiliates without the prior approval of our Board who are not interested persons and, in some cases, prior approval by the SEC. For example, under the 1940 Act, absent receipt of exemptive relief from the SEC, we and our affiliates may be precluded from co-investing in private placements of securities. As a result of one or more of these situations, we may not be able to invest as much as we otherwise would in certain investments or may not be able to liquidate a position as quickly.
 
We are required to provide and maintain a bond issued by a reputable fidelity insurance company to protect us against larceny and embezzlement. Furthermore, as a BDC, we are prohibited from protecting any director or officer against any liability to us or our stockholders arising from willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard of the duties involved in the conduct of such person’s office.
 
We have adopted and implemented written policies and procedures reasonably designed to prevent violation of the federal securities laws and review these policies and procedures annually for their adequacy and the effectiveness of their implementation. We have designated a chief compliance officer to be responsible for administering the policies and procedures.
As a BDC, we are subject to certain risks and uncertainties. See “Risk Factors - Risks Relating to our Business and Structure.”
Qualifying Assets

Under the 1940 Act, a BDC may not acquire any asset other than assets of the type listed in Section 55(a) of the 1940 Act, which are referred to as qualifying assets, unless, at the time the acquisition is made, qualifying assets represent at least 70% of the company's total assets. The principal categories of qualifying assets relevant to our business are any of the following:

(1)
Securities purchased in transactions not involving any public offering from the issuer of such securities, which issuer (subject to certain limited exceptions) is an eligible portfolio company (as defined below), or from any person who is, or has been during the preceding 13 months, an affiliated person of an eligible portfolio company, or from any other person, subject to such rules as may be prescribed by the SEC.

(2)
Securities of any eligible portfolio company that we control.

(3)
Securities purchased in a private transaction from a U.S. issuer that is not an investment company or from an affiliated person of the issuer, or in transactions incident thereto, if the issuer is in bankruptcy and subject to reorganization or if the issuer, immediately prior to the purchase of its securities was unable to meet its obligations as they came due without material assistance other than conventional lending or financing arrangements.

(4)
Securities of an eligible portfolio company purchased from any person in a private transaction if there is no ready market for such securities and we already own 60% of the outstanding equity of the eligible portfolio company.

(5)
Securities received in exchange for or distributed on or with respect to securities described in (1) through (4) above, or pursuant to the exercise of warrants or rights relating to such securities.

(6)
Cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities or high-quality debt securities maturing in one year or less from the time of investment.

In addition, a BDC must have been organized and have its principal place of business in the United States and must be operated for the purpose of making investments in the types of securities described in (1), (2) or (3) above.

An eligible portfolio company is defined in the 1940 Act as any issuer which:

(a)
is organized under the laws of, and has its principal place of business in, the United States;


20

Table of Contents

(b)
is not an investment company (other than a small business investment company wholly owned by the BDC) or a company that would be an investment company but for certain exclusions under the 1940 Act; and

(c)
satisfies any of the following:

(i)
does not have any class of securities that is traded on a national securities exchange or has a class of securities listed on a national securities exchange but has an aggregate market value of outstanding voting and non-voting common equity of less than $250 million;

(ii)
is controlled by a BDC or a group of companies including a BDC and the BDC has an affiliated person who is a director of the eligible portfolio company; or

(iii)
is a small and solvent company having total assets of not more than $4 million and capital and surplus of not less than $2 million.
Control, as defined by the 1940 Act, is presumed to exist where a business development company beneficially owns more than 25% of the outstanding voting securities of the portfolio company.
We do not intend to acquire securities issued by any investment company that exceed the limits imposed by the 1940 Act. Under these limits, we generally cannot acquire more than 3% of the voting stock of any investment company (as defined in the 1940 Act), invest more than 5% of the value of our total assets in the securities of one such investment company or invest more than 10% of the value of our total assets in the securities of such investment companies in the aggregate. With regard to that portion of our portfolio invested in securities issued by investment companies, it should be noted that such investments might subject our stockholders to additional expenses. None of our investment policies is fundamental and any may be changed without stockholder approval.
Significant Managerial Assistance
A BDC must have been organized and have its principal place of business in the United States and must be operated for the purpose of making investments in the types of securities described above. However, in order to count portfolio securities as qualifying assets for the purpose of the 70% test, the BDC must either control the issuer of the securities or must offer to make available to the issuer of the securities (other than small and solvent companies described above) significant managerial assistance; except that, where the BDC purchases such securities in conjunction with one or more other persons acting together, one of the other persons in the group may make available such managerial assistance. Making available significant managerial assistance means, among other things, any arrangement whereby the BDC, through its directors, officers or employees, offers to provide, and, if accepted, does so provide, significant guidance and counsel concerning the management, operations or business objectives and policies of a portfolio company through monitoring of portfolio company operations, selective participation in board and management meetings, consulting with and advising a portfolio company’s officers or other organizational or financial guidance.
Issuance of Additional Shares
 
We are not generally able to issue and sell our common stock at a price below net asset value, or NAV. We may, however, issue and sell our common stock, at a price below the current NAV of the common stock, or issue and sell warrants, options or rights to acquire such common stock, at a price below the current NAV of the common stock if our Board determines that such sale is in our best interest and in the best interests of our stockholders, and our stockholders have approved our policy and practice of making such sales within the preceding 12 months. On October 27, 2014 our stockholders approved our ability to issue common stock below our current NAV. In any such case, the price at which our securities are to be issued and sold may not be less than a price which, in the determination of our Board, closely approximates the market value of such securities.
 
In addition, under the 1940 Act, a BDC is subject to restrictions on the amount of warrants, options, restricted stock or rights to purchase shares of capital stock that it may have outstanding at any time. In particular, the amount of capital stock that would result from the conversion or exercise of all outstanding warrants, options or rights to purchase capital stock cannot exceed 25% of the BDC’s total outstanding shares of capital stock. This amount is reduced to 20% of the BDC’s total outstanding shares of capital stock if the amount of warrants, options or rights issued pursuant to an executive compensation plan would exceed 15% of the BDC’s total outstanding shares of capital stock


21

Table of Contents

Temporary Investments
Pending investment in other types of qualifying assets, as described above, our investments may consist of cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities or high quality debt securities maturing in one year or less from the time of investment, which we refer to, collectively, as temporary investments, so that 70% of our assets are qualifying assets. Typically, we will invest in U.S. treasury bills or in repurchase agreements, provided that such agreements are fully collateralized by cash or securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies. A repurchase agreement involves the purchase by an investor, such as us, of a specified security and the simultaneous agreement by the seller to repurchase it at an agreed upon future date and at a price which is greater than the purchase price by an amount that reflects an agreed-upon interest rate. There is no percentage restriction on the proportion of our assets that may be invested in such repurchase agreements. However, if more than 25% of our total assets constitute repurchase agreements from a single counterparty, we would not meet the diversification tests imposed on us by the Code in order to qualify as a RIC for federal income tax purposes. Thus, we do not intend to enter into repurchase agreements with a single counterparty in excess of this limit. We will monitor the creditworthiness of the counterparties with which we enter into repurchase agreement transactions.
Senior Securities; Coverage Ratio
We are permitted, under specified conditions, to issue multiple classes of indebtedness and one class of stock senior to our common stock if our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, is at least equal to 200% immediately after each such issuance. In addition, we may not be permitted to declare any cash dividend or other distribution on our outstanding common shares, or purchase any such shares, unless, at the time of such declaration or purchase, we have asset coverage of at least 200% after deducting the amount of such dividend, distribution, or purchase price. We may also borrow amounts up to 5% of the value of our total assets for temporary or emergency purposes. For a discussion of the risks associated with the resulting leverage, see “Risk Factors - Risks Related to Our Business Structure - Because we borrow money, the potential for loss on amounts invested in us is magnified and may increase the risk of investing in us.”
Code of Ethics
In connection with the BDC Conversion, we adopted a code of ethics pursuant to Rule 17j-1 under the 1940 Act that establishes procedures for personal investments and restricts certain transactions by our personnel. Our code of ethics generally will not permit investments by our employees in securities that may be purchased or held by us. You may read and copy our code of ethics at the SEC’s Public Reference Room in Washington, D.C. You may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the code of ethics is published and available on the Company’s website. at www.thesba.com and on the EDGAR database on the SEC website at www,sec,gov.
Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures
We vote proxies relating to our portfolio securities in a manner in which we believe is in the best interest of our stockholders. We review on a case-by-case basis each proposal submitted to a stockholder vote to determine its impact on the portfolio securities held by us. Although we generally vote against proposals that may have a negative impact on our portfolio securities, we may vote for such a proposal if there exists compelling long-term reasons to do so.
Our proxy voting decisions are made by our senior lending team and our executive committee, which are responsible for monitoring each of our investments. To ensure that our vote is not the product of a conflict of interest, we require that: (i) anyone involved in the decision making process disclose to our chief compliance officer any potential conflict that he or she is aware of and any contact that he or she has had with any interested party regarding a proxy vote; and (ii) employees involved in the decision making process or vote administration are prohibited from revealing how we intend to vote on a proposal in order to reduce any attempted influence from interested parties.
Stockholders may obtain information regarding how we voted proxies with respect to our portfolio securities by making a written request for information to: Chief Compliance Officer, 212 West 35th Street, 2nd Floor, New York, New York 10001.
Other
We will be periodically examined by the SEC for compliance with the Exchange Act and the 1940 Act.
We are required to provide and maintain a bond issued by a reputable fidelity insurance company to protect us against larceny and embezzlement. Furthermore, as a business development company, we are prohibited from protecting any director or officer

22

Table of Contents

against any liability to our stockholders arising from willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard of the duties involved in the conduct of such person’s office.
We are required to adopt and implement written policies and procedures reasonably designed to prevent violation of the federal securities laws, review these policies and procedures annually for their adequacy and the effectiveness of their implementation. We have designated Matthew Ash to be our chief compliance officer to be responsible for administering these policies and procedures.

Privacy Principles

We are committed to maintaining the privacy of our stockholders and to safeguarding their non-public personal information. The following information is provided to help you understand what personal information we collect, how we protect that information and why, in certain cases, we may share information with select other parties.

Generally, we do not receive any non-public personal information relating to our stockholders, although certain non-public personal information of our stockholders may become available to us. We do not disclose any non-public personal information about our stockholders or former stockholders to anyone, except as permitted by law or as is necessary in order to service stockholder accounts (for example, to a transfer agent or third-party administrator).We will maintain physical, electronic and procedural safeguards designed to protect the non-public personal information of our stockholders.
NASDAQ Capital Market Requirements
We have adopted certain policies and procedures intended to comply with the NASDAQ Capital Market’s corporate governance rules. We will continue to monitor our compliance with all future listing standards that are approved by the SEC and will take actions necessary to ensure that we are in compliance therewith.
Election to be Taxed as a RIC
As a BDC, we intend to elect to be treated, and qualify annually thereafter, as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, beginning with our 2015 taxable year. As a RIC, we generally will not have to pay corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes on any income that we distribute to our stockholders as dividends. To qualify as a RIC, we must, among other things, meet certain source-of-income and asset diversification requirements (as described below). In addition, to qualify for RIC tax treatment we must distribute to our stockholders, for each taxable year, at least 90% of our “investment company taxable income,” which is generally our ordinary income plus the excess of our realized net short-term capital gains over our realized net long-term capital losses (the “Annual Distribution Requirement”).
 
Taxation as a Regulated Investment Company
For any taxable year in which we:
qualify as a RIC; and
satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement,
we generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax on the portion of our income we distribute (or are deemed to distribute) to stockholders. We will be subject to U.S. federal income tax at the regular corporate rates on any income or capital gains not distributed (or deemed distributed) to our stockholders.
We will be subject to a 4% nondeductible U.S. federal excise tax on certain undistributed income unless we distribute in a timely manner an amount at least equal to the sum of (1) 98% of our net ordinary income for each calendar year, (2) 98.2% of our capital gain net income for the one-year period ending October 31 in that calendar year and (3) any income recognized, but not distributed, in preceding years and on which we paid no corporate-level income tax (the “Excise Tax Avoidance Requirement”). We generally will endeavor in each taxable year to make sufficient distributions to our stockholders to avoid any U.S. federal excise tax on our earnings.
In order to qualify as a RIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we must, among other things:
continue to qualify as a BDC under the 1940 Act at all times during each taxable year;
derive in each taxable year at least 90% of our gross income from dividends, interest, payments with respect to loans of certain securities, gains from the sale of stock or other securities, net income from certain “qualified publicly traded partnerships,” or other income derived with respect to our business of investing in such stock or securities (the “90% Income Test”); and

23

Table of Contents

diversify our holdings so that at the end of each quarter of the taxable year:
at least 50% of the value of our assets consists of cash, cash equivalents, U.S. Government securities, securities of other RICs, and other securities if such other securities of any one issuer do not represent more than 5% of the value of our assets or more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of the issuer; and
no more than 25% of the value of our assets is invested in the securities, other than U.S. government securities or securities of other RICs, of one issuer, of two or more issuers that are controlled, as determined under applicable Code rules, by us and that are engaged in the same or similar or related trades or businesses or of certain “qualified publicly traded partnerships” (the “Diversification Tests”).
Qualified earnings may exclude such income as management fees received in connection with our subsidiaries or other potential outside managed funds and certain other fees.
In accordance with certain applicable Treasury regulations and private letter rulings issued by the IRS, a RIC may treat a distribution of its own stock as fulfilling its RIC distribution requirements if each stockholder may elect to receive his or her entire distribution in either cash or stock of the RIC, subject to a limitation that the aggregate amount of cash to be distributed to all stockholders must be at least 20% of the aggregate declared distribution. If too many stockholders elect to receive cash, each stockholder electing to receive cash must receive a pro rata amount of cash (with the balance of the distribution paid in stock). In no event will any stockholder, electing to receive cash, receive less than 20% of his or her entire distribution in cash. If these and certain other requirements are met, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the amount of the dividend paid in stock will be equal to the amount of cash that could have been received instead of stock. We have no current intention of paying dividends in shares of our stock in accordance with these Treasury regulations or private letter rulings.

We may be required to recognize taxable income in circumstances in which we do not receive cash. For example, if we hold debt obligations that are treated under applicable tax rules as having original issue discount (such as debt instruments with PIK interest or, in certain cases, increasing interest rates or issued with warrants), we must include in income each year a portion of the original issue discount that accrues over the life of the obligation, regardless of whether cash representing such income is received by us in the same taxable year. We may also have to include in income other amounts that we have not yet received in cash, such as PIK interest, deferred loan origination fees that are paid after origination of the loan or are paid in non-cash compensation such as warrants or stock, or certain income with respect to equity investments in foreign corporations. Because any original issue discount or other amounts accrued will be included in our investment company taxable income for the year of accrual, we may be required to make a distribution to our stockholders in order to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement, even though we will not have received any corresponding cash amount.
Gain or loss realized by us from the sale or exchange of warrants acquired by us as well as any loss attributable to the lapse of such warrants generally will be treated as capital gain or loss. Such gain or loss generally will be long-term or short-term, depending on how long we held a particular warrant.
Although we do not presently expect to do so, we are authorized to borrow funds and to sell assets in order to satisfy distribution requirements. However, under the 1940 Act, we are not permitted to make distributions to our stockholders while our debt obligations and other senior securities are outstanding unless certain “asset coverage” tests are met. Moreover, our ability to dispose of assets to meet our distribution requirements may be limited by (1) the illiquid nature of our portfolio and/or (2) other requirements relating to our status as a RIC, including the Diversification Tests. If we dispose of assets in order to meet the Annual Distribution Requirement or the Excise Tax Avoidance Requirement, we may make such dispositions at times that, from an investment standpoint, are not advantageous. If we are prohibited from making distributions or are unable to obtain cash from other sources to make the distributions, we may fail to qualify as a RIC, which would result in us becoming subject to corporate-level federal income tax.
In addition, we will be partially dependent on our subsidiaries for cash distributions to enable us to meet the RIC distribution requirements. Some of our subsidiaries may be limited by the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, and SBA regulations, from making certain distributions to us that may be necessary to maintain our status as a RIC. We may have to request a waiver of the SBA’s restrictions for our subsidiaries to make certain distributions to maintain our RIC status. We cannot assure you that the SBA will grant such waiver. If our subsidiaries are unable to obtain a waiver, compliance with the SBA regulations may cause us to fail to qualify as a RIC, which would result in us becoming subject to corporate-level federal income tax.
The remainder of this discussion assumes that we will qualify as a RIC and will have satisfied the Annual Distribution Requirement for the year ended December 31, 2015.

24

Table of Contents

Any transactions in options, futures contracts, constructive sales, hedging, straddle, conversion or similar transactions, and forward contracts will be subject to special tax rules, the effect of which may be to accelerate income to us, defer losses, cause adjustments to the holding periods of our investments, convert long-term capital gains into short-term capital gains, convert short-term capital losses into long-term capital losses or have other tax consequences. These rules could affect the amount, timing and character of distributions to stockholders. We do not currently intend to engage in these types of transactions.
A RIC is limited in its ability to deduct expenses in excess of its “investment company taxable income” (which is, generally, ordinary income plus net realized short-term capital gains in excess of net realized long-term capital losses). If our expenses in a given year exceed gross taxable income (e.g., as the result of large amounts of equity-based compensation), we would experience a net operating loss for that year. However, a RIC is not permitted to carry forward net operating losses to subsequent years. In addition, expenses can be used only to offset investment company taxable income, not net capital gain. Due to these limits on the deductibility of expenses, we may for tax purposes have aggregate taxable income for several years that we are required to distribute and that is taxable to our stockholders even if such income is greater than the aggregate net income we actually earned during those years. Such required distributions may be made from our cash assets or by liquidation of investments, if necessary. We may realize gains or losses from such liquidations. In the event we realize net capital gains from such transactions, you may receive a larger capital gain distribution than you would have received in the absence of such transactions.
Investment income received from sources within foreign countries, or capital gains earned by investing in securities of foreign issuers, may be subject to foreign income taxes withheld at the source. In this regard, withholding tax rates in countries with which the United States does not have a tax treaty are often as high as 35% or more. The United States has entered into tax treaties with many foreign countries that may entitle us to a reduced rate of tax or exemption from tax on this related income and gains. The effective rate of foreign tax cannot be determined at this time since the amount of our assets to be invested within various countries is not now known. We do not anticipate being eligible for the special election that allows a RIC to treat foreign income taxes paid by such RIC as paid by its stockholders.
If we acquire stock in certain foreign corporations that receive at least 75% of their annual gross income from passive sources (such as interest, dividends, rents, royalties or capital gain) or hold at least 50% of their total assets in investments producing such passive income (“passive foreign investment companies”), we could be subject to federal income tax and additional interest charges on “excess distributions” received from such companies or gain from the sale of stock in such companies, even if all income or gain actually received by us is timely distributed to our stockholders. We would not be able to pass through to our stockholders any credit or deduction for such a tax. Certain elections may, if available, ameliorate these adverse tax consequences, but any such election requires us to recognize taxable income or gain without the concurrent receipt of cash. We intend to limit and/or manage our holdings in passive foreign investment companies to minimize our tax liability.
Foreign exchange gains and losses realized by us in connection with certain transactions involving non-dollar debt securities, certain foreign currency futures contracts, foreign currency option contracts, foreign currency forward contracts, foreign currencies, or payables or receivables denominated in a foreign currency are subject to Code provisions that generally treat such gains and losses as ordinary income and losses and may affect the amount, timing and character of distributions to our stockholders. Any such transactions that are not directly related to our investment in securities (possibly including speculative currency positions or currency derivatives not used for hedging purposes) could, under future Treasury regulations, produce income not among the types of “qualifying income” from which a RIC must derive at least 90% of its annual gross income.

Failure to Qualify as a RIC
 
If we fail to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement or fail to qualify as a RIC in any taxable year, assuming we do not qualify for or take advantage of certain remedial provisions, we will be subject to tax in that year on all of our taxable income, regardless of whether we make any distributions to our stockholders. In that case, all of our income will be subject to corporate-level federal income tax, reducing the amount available to be distributed to our stockholders. In contrast, assuming we qualify as a RIC, our corporate-level federal income tax liability should be substantially reduced or eliminated. See “Election to be Taxed as a RIC” above.
 
If we are unable to maintain our status as a RIC, we would be subject to tax on all of our taxable income at regular corporate rates. We would not be able to deduct distributions to stockholders, nor would they be required to be made. Distributions would generally be taxable to our stockholders as ordinary distribution income eligible for the 15% or 20% maximum rate to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits. Subject to certain limitations under the Code, dividends paid by us to corporate distributees would be eligible for the dividends received deduction. Distributions in excess of our current and accumulated earnings and profits would be treated first as a return of capital to the extent of the stockholder’s tax basis in our common stock, and any remaining distributions would be treated as a capital gain.

25

Table of Contents


Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”) imposes a wide variety of new regulatory requirements on publicly-held companies and their insiders. Many of these requirements affect us. For example:

Pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the 1934 Act, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Accounting Officer must certify the accuracy of the consolidated financial statements contained in our periodic reports;

Pursuant to Item 307 of Regulation S-K, our periodic reports must disclose our conclusions about the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures;

Pursuant to Rule 13a-15 of the 1934 Act, our management must prepare a report regarding its assessment of our internal controls over financial reporting; and

Pursuant to Item 308 of Regulation S-K and Rule 13a-15 of the 1934 Act, our periodic reports must disclose whether there were significant changes in our internal controls or in other factors that could significantly affect these controls subsequent to the date of their evaluation, including any corrective actions with regard to significant deficiencies and material weaknesses.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires us to review our current policies and procedures to determine whether we comply with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the regulations promulgated thereunder. We will continue to monitor our compliance with all regulations that are adopted under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and will take actions necessary to ensure that we are in compliance therewith.
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
The following is a summary of the risk factors that we believe are most relevant to our business. These are factors that, individually or in the aggregate, we think could cause our actual results to differ significantly from anticipated or historical results. If any of the following risks occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. In that case, the value of our common stock could decline and stockholders may lose all or part of their investment. You should understand that it is not possible to predict or identify all such factors. Consequently, you should not consider the following to be a complete discussion of all potential risks or uncertainties. We undertake no obligation to publicly update forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise, unless required by law.
RISKS RELATING TO OUR BUSINESS AND STRUCTURE

Throughout our 16 year history we have never operated as a BDC

Although Newtek has operated since 1998, we have no operating history as a BDC. As a result, we can offer no assurance that we will achieve our investment objective and that the value of any investment in our Company will not decline substantially. As a BDC, we will be subject to the regulatory requirements of the SEC, in addition to the specific regulatory requirements applicable to BDCs under the 1940 Act and RICs under the Code. Our management has not had any prior experience operating under this BDC regulatory framework, and we may incur substantial additional costs, and expend significant time or other resources, to do so. In addition, we may be unable to generate sufficient revenue from our operations to make or sustain distributions to our stockholders.

Our investment portfolio will be recorded at fair value, with our board of directors having final responsibility for overseeing, reviewing and approving, in good faith, its estimate of fair value and, as a result, there will be uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments.

Under the 1940 Act, we will be required to carry our portfolio investments at market value or, if there is no readily available market value, at fair value as determined by us, with our board of directors having final responsibility for overseeing, reviewing and approving, in good faith, our estimate of fair value. Typically, there will not be a public market for the securities of the privately held companies in which we invest. As a result, we will value these securities annually and quarterly at fair value based on various inputs, including management, third-party valuation firms and our audit committee, and with the oversight, review and approval of our board of directors.


26

Table of Contents

The determination of fair value and consequently, the amount of unrealized gains and losses in our portfolio, are to a certain degree, subjective and dependent on a valuation process approved by our board of directors. Certain factors that may be considered in determining the fair value of our investments include external events, such as private mergers, sales and acquisitions involving comparable companies. Because such valuations, and particularly valuations of private securities and private companies, are inherently uncertain, they may fluctuate over short periods of time and may be based on estimates. Our determinations of fair value may differ materially from the values that would have been used if a ready market for these securities existed. Due to this uncertainty, our fair value determinations may cause our net asset value on a given date to materially understate or overstate the value that we may ultimately realize on one or more of our investments. As a result, investors purchasing our common stock based on an overstated net asset value would pay a higher price than the value of our investments might warrant. Conversely, investors selling stock during a period in which the net asset value understates the value of our investments will receive a lower price for their stock than the value of our investments might warrant.

Our financial condition and results of operations will depend on our ability to manage and deploy capital effectively.

Our ability to achieve our investment objective will depend on our ability to manage and deploy capital, which will depend, in turn, on our management’s ability to identify, evaluate and monitor, and our ability to finance and invest in, companies that meet our investment criteria.

Accomplishing our investment objective on a cost-effective basis will largely be a function of our management’s handling of the investment process, its ability to provide competent, attentive and efficient services and our access to investments offering acceptable terms. In addition to monitoring the performance of our existing investments, our senior lending team and our executive committee will also be called upon, from time to time, to provide managerial assistance to some of our portfolio companies. These demands on their time may distract them or slow the rate of investment.

Even if we are able to grow and build upon our investment operations, any failure to manage our growth effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. The results of our operations will depend on many factors, including the availability of opportunities for investment, readily accessible short and long-term funding alternatives in the financial markets and economic conditions. Furthermore, if we cannot successfully operate our business or implement our investment policies and strategies as described herein, it could negatively impact our ability to pay dividends.
 
We are dependent upon our senior lending team and our executive committee for our future success, and if we are unable to hire and retain qualified personnel or if we lose any member of our senior lending team or our executive committee our ability to achieve our investment objective could be significantly harmed.

We depend on our senior lending team and executive committee as well as other key personnel for the identification, final selection, structuring, closing and monitoring of our investments. These executive officers and employees have critical industry experience and relationships that we rely on to implement our business plan. Our future success depends on the continued service of our senior lending team and our executive committee and the replacement of any departing individuals with others of comparable skills and experience. The departure of any of the members of our senior lending team, our executive committee or a significant number of our senior personnel could have a material adverse effect on our ability to achieve our investment objective. As a result, we may not be able to operate our business as we expect, and our ability to compete could be harmed, which could cause our operating results to suffer.

We operate in a highly competitive market for investment opportunities, which could reduce returns and result in losses.

We will compete for investments with other BDCs with similar investment strategies, private equity funds with similar investment strategies, venture lending funds, finance companies with venture lending units and banks focused on venture lending. Many of our competitors will be substantially larger and have considerably greater financial, technical and marketing resources than us. For example, some competitors may have a lower cost of capital and access to funding sources that will not be available to us. In addition, some of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances or different risk assessments than we will have. These characteristics could allow our competitors to consider a wider variety of investments, establish more relationships and offer better pricing and more flexible structuring than we will be able to offer. We may lose investment opportunities if we do not match our competitors’ pricing, terms and structure. If we are forced to match our competitors’ pricing, terms and structure, we may not be able to achieve acceptable returns on our investments or may bear substantial risk of capital loss. Furthermore, many of our competitors will have greater experience operating under, or will not be subject to, the regulatory restrictions that the 1940 Act will impose on us as a BDC.

If we are unable to source investments effectively, we may be unable to achieve our investment objective.

27

Table of Contents


Our ability to achieve our investment objective depends on our senior lending team’s and our executive committee’s ability to identify, evaluate and invest in suitable companies that meet our investment criteria. Accomplishing this result on a cost-effective basis is largely a function of our marketing capabilities, our management of the investment process, our ability to provide efficient services and our access to financing sources on acceptable terms. In addition to monitoring the performance of our existing investments, members of our senior lending team, our executive committee and our other investment professionals may also be called upon to provide managerial assistance to our portfolio companies. These demands on their time may distract them or slow the rate of investment. To grow, we need to continue to hire, train, supervise and manage new employees and to implement computer and other systems capable of effectively accommodating our growth. However, we cannot provide assurance that any such employees will contribute to the success of our business or that we will implement such systems effectively. Failure to manage our future growth effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our business model depends to a significant extent upon strong referral relationships, and our inability to maintain or further develop these relationships, as well as the failure of these relationships to generate investment opportunities, could adversely affect our business.

We expect that members of our senior lending team and our executive committee will maintain their relationships with intermediaries, financial institutions, investment bankers, commercial bankers, financial advisors, attorneys, accountants, consultants and other individuals within their networks, and we will rely to a significant extent upon these relationships to provide us with potential investment opportunities. If our senior lending team and our executive committee fail to maintain its existing relationships or develop new relationships with sources of investment opportunities, we will not be able to grow our investment portfolio. In addition, individuals with whom members of our senior lending team and our executive committee have relationships are not obligated to provide us with investment opportunities, and, therefore, there is no assurance that such relationships will generate investment opportunities for us.


Any failure on our part to maintain our status as a BDC would reduce our operating flexibility.

We have elected to be regulated as a BDC under the 1940 Act. The 1940 Act imposes numerous constraints on the operations of BDCs. For example, BDCs are required to invest at least 70% of their gross assets in specified types of securities, primarily in private companies or thinly-traded U.S. public companies, cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities and other high quality debt investments that mature in one year or less. Furthermore, any failure to comply with the requirements imposed on BDCs by the 1940 Act could cause the SEC to bring an enforcement action against us and/or expose us to claims of private litigants. In addition, upon approval of a majority of our stockholders, we may elect to withdraw our status as a BDC. If we decide to withdraw our election, or if we otherwise fail to qualify, or maintain our qualification, as a BDC, we may be subject to the substantially greater regulation under the 1940 Act as a closed-end investment company. Compliance with such regulations would significantly decrease our operating flexibility, and could significantly increase our costs of doing business.

Regulations governing our operation as a BDC affect our ability to raise additional capital and the way in which we do so. As a BDC, the necessity of raising additional capital may expose us to risks, including the typical risks associated with leverage.

We may issue debt securities or preferred stock and/or borrow money from banks or other financial institutions, which we refer to collectively as “senior securities,” up to the maximum amount permitted by the 1940 Act. Under the provisions of the 1940 Act, we will be permitted, as a BDC, to issue senior securities in amounts such that our asset coverage ratio, as defined in the 1940 Act, equals at least 200% of gross assets less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities, after each issuance of senior securities. If the value of our assets declines, we may be unable to satisfy this test. If that happens, we may be required to sell a portion of our investments and, depending on the nature of our leverage, repay a portion of our indebtedness at a time when such sales may be disadvantageous. Also, any amounts that we use to service our indebtedness would not be available for distributions to our common stockholders. Continuing to expand our debt financing activities in SBA 7(a) loans will require us to raise additional capital. The failure to continue to generate such loans on a consistent basis could have a material impact on our results of operations, and accordingly, our ability to make distributions to our stockholders. Additionally, as a RIC, we will generally be unable to retain earnings in the same manner and to the same extent as we have historically, which consequently increases the need to raise additional debt and equity capital after completion of this offering. Furthermore, as a result of issuing senior securities, we would also be exposed to typical risks associated with leverage, including an increased risk of loss. If we issue preferred stock, the preferred stock would rank “senior” to common stock in our capital structure, preferred stockholders would have separate voting rights on certain matters and might have other rights, preferences, or privileges more favorable than those of our common stockholders, and the issuance of preferred stock could

28

Table of Contents

have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a transaction or a change of control that might involve a premium price for holders of our common stock or otherwise be in your best interest.

We generally may not issue and sell our common stock at a price below net asset value per share. We may, however, sell our common stock, or warrants, options or rights to acquire our common stock, at a price below the then-current net asset value per share of our common stock if our board of directors determines that such sale is in our best interests and in the best interests of our stockholders, and our stockholders approve such sale. In any such case, the price at which our securities are to be issued and sold may not be less than a price that, in the determination of our board of directors, closely approximates the market value of such securities (less any distributing commission or discount). If we raise additional funds by issuing more common stock or senior securities convertible into, or exchangeable for, our common stock, then the percentage ownership of our stockholders at that time will decrease, and you may experience dilution.

Because we borrow money, the potential for loss on amounts invested in us is magnified and may increase the risk of investing in us.

Borrowings, also known as leverage, magnify the potential for loss on investments in our indebtedness and on invested equity capital. As we use leverage to partially finance our investments, you will experience increased risks of investing in our securities. If the value of our assets increases, then leveraging would cause the net asset value attributable to our common stock to increase more sharply than it would have had we not leveraged. Conversely, if the value of our assets decreases, leveraging would cause net asset value to decline more sharply than it otherwise would have had we not leveraged our business. Similarly, any increase in our income in excess of interest payable on the borrowed funds would cause our net investment income to increase more than it would without the leverage, while any decrease in our income would cause net investment income to decline more sharply than it would have had we not borrowed. Such a decline could negatively affect our ability to pay common stock dividends, scheduled debt payments or other payments related to our securities. Leverage is generally considered a speculative investment technique.

Illustration: The following table illustrates the effect of leverage on returns from an investment in our common stock assuming various annual returns, net of expenses. The calculations in the table below are hypothetical and actual returns may be higher or lower than those appearing in the table below:
Assumed Return on Our Portfolio (1)
(net of expenses)
 
(10
)%
(5
)%
0
 %
5
%
10
%
Corresponding net return to stockholders (2)
(20.82
)%
(11.76
)%
(2.69
)%
6.38
%
15.45
%
(1) Assumes $301.8 million in total assets, $122.5 million in debt outstanding, $166.4 million in net assets as of December 31, 2014, and an average cost of funds of 3.65%. Actual interest payments may be different.
(2) In order for us to cover our annual interest payments on indebtedness, we must achieve annuals returns on our December 31, 2014 total assets of at least 1.48%.

Our ability to achieve our investment objective may depend in part on our ability to access additional leverage on favorable terms, and there can be no assurance that such additional leverage can in fact be achieved.

To the extent we borrow money to finance our investments, changes in interest rates will affect our cost of capital and net investment income.

To the extent we borrow money to finance investments, our net investment income will depend, in part, upon the difference between the rate at which we borrow funds and the rate at which we invest those funds. As a result, we can offer no assurance that a significant change in market interest rates will not have a material adverse effect on our net investment income in the event we borrow money to finance our investments. In periods of rising interest rates, our cost of funds would increase, which could reduce our net investment income. We expect that our long-term fixed-rate investments will be financed primarily with equity and/or long-term debt. We may use interest rate risk management techniques in an effort to limit our exposure to interest rate fluctuations. Such techniques may include various interest rate hedging activities to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act. If we do not implement these techniques properly, we could experience losses on our hedging positions, which could be material.

We may experience fluctuations in our quarterly and annual results.

29

Table of Contents


We may experience fluctuations in our quarterly and annual operating results due to a number of factors, including our ability or inability to make investments in companies that meet our investment criteria, the interest rate payable on the debt securities we acquire, the level of portfolio dividend and fee income, the level of our expenses, variations in and the timing of the recognition of realized and unrealized gains or losses, the degree to which we encounter competition in our markets and general economic conditions. As a result of these factors, results for any period should not be relied upon as being indicative of performance in future periods.

Our board of directors may change our investment objective, operating policies and strategies without prior notice or stockholder approval, the effects of which may be adverse.

Although we must obtain shareholder approval to cease to be, or withdraw our election as, a BDC, our board of directors will have the authority to modify or waive our investment objective, current operating policies, investment criteria and strategies without prior notice and without stockholder approval. We cannot predict the effect any changes to our current operating policies, investment criteria and strategies would have on our business, net asset value, operating results and value of our stock. However, the effects might be adverse, which could negatively impact our ability to make distributions and cause stockholders to lose all or part of their investment.

We will be subject to corporate-level income tax if we are unable to qualify as a RIC.

Although we intend to elect to be treated as a RIC commencing with our tax year ending December 31, 2015, no assurance can be given that we will be able to qualify for and maintain our qualification as a RIC. To obtain and maintain our qualification as a RIC, we must meet certain source-of-asset diversification, and distribution requirements.

The income source requirement will be satisfied if we obtain at least 90% of our income for each year from dividends, interest, gains from the sale of stock or securities or similar sources.

The asset diversification requirement will be satisfied if we meet certain asset diversification requirements at the end of each quarter of our taxable year. Failure to meet those requirements may result in our having to dispose of certain investments quickly in order to prevent the loss of our qualification as a RIC. Because most of our investments will be in private companies, and therefore will be relatively illiquid, any such dispositions could be made at disadvantageous prices and could result in substantial losses. The annual distribution requirement for a RIC will be satisfied if we distribute to our stockholders on an annual basis at least 90% of our net ordinary income and net short-term capital gains in excess of our net long-term capital losses, if any. Because we use debt financing, we are subject to certain asset coverage ratio requirements under the 1940 Act and financial covenants under loan and credit agreements that could, under certain circumstances, restrict us from making distributions necessary to satisfy the distribution requirement. If we are unable to obtain cash from other sources, we could fail to qualify as a RIC.

If we fail to qualify for RIC tax treatment for any reason and remain or become subject to corporate income tax, the resulting corporate taxes could substantially reduce our net assets, the amount of income available for distribution and the amount of our
distributions.

We may not be able to pay distributions to our stockholders, our distributions may not grow over time and a portion of our distributions may be a return of capital.

We intend to pay distributions to our stockholders out of assets legally available for distribution. We cannot assure investors that we will achieve investment results that will allow us to make a specified level of cash distributions or year-to-year increases in cash distributions. Our ability to pay distributions might be adversely affected by, among other things, the impact of one or more of the risk factors described in this prospectus. In addition, the inability to satisfy the asset coverage test applicable to us as a BDC can limit our ability to pay distributions. All distributions will be paid at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on our earnings, our financial condition, maintenance of our RIC status, compliance with applicable BDC regulations and such other factors as our board of directors may deem relevant from time to time. We cannot assure investors that we will pay distributions to our stockholders in the future.

When we make distributions, we will be required to determine the extent to which such distributions are paid out of current or accumulated earnings and profits. Distributions in excess of current and accumulated earnings and profits will be treated as a non-taxable return of capital to the extent of an investor’s basis in our stock and, assuming that an investor holds our stock as a capital asset, thereafter as a capital gain. Generally, a non-taxable return of capital will reduce an investor’s basis in our stock for federal tax purposes, which will result in higher tax liability when the stock is sold. Stockholders should read any written

30

Table of Contents

disclosure accompanying a distribution carefully and should not assume that the source of any distribution is our ordinary income or gains.

We may have difficulty paying our required distributions if we recognize income before or without receiving cash representing such income.

For U.S. federal income tax purposes, we will include in our taxable income certain amounts that we have not yet received in cash, such as original issue discount, which may arise if we receive warrants in connection with the origination of a loan or possibly in other circumstances, or PIK interest. Such original issue discount or increases in loan balances as a result of contractual PIK arrangements will be included in our taxable income before we receive any corresponding cash payments. We also may be required to include in our taxable income certain other amounts that we will not receive in cash.

Since, in certain cases, we may recognize taxable income before or without receiving corresponding cash payments, we may have difficulty meeting the annual distribution requirement necessary to maintain our qualification as a RIC. Accordingly, to satisfy our RIC distribution requirements, we may have to sell some of our investments at times and/or at prices we would not consider advantageous, raise additional debt or equity capital or forgo new investment opportunities. If we are not able to obtain cash from other sources, we may fail to qualify as a RIC and thus become subject to corporate-level income tax.

We may in the future choose to pay dividends in our own stock, in which case investors may be required to pay tax in excess of the cash they receive.

We may distribute taxable dividends that are payable in part in our stock. In accordance with certain applicable Treasury regulations and private letter rulings issued by the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”), a RIC may treat a distribution of its own stock as fulfilling the RIC distribution requirements if each stockholder may elect to receive his or her entire distribution in either cash or stock of the RIC, subject to a limitation that the aggregate amount of cash to be distributed to all stockholders must be at least 20% of the aggregate declared distribution. If too many stockholders elect to receive cash, each stockholder electing to receive cash must receive a pro rata amount of cash (with the balance of the distribution paid in stock). In no event will any stockholder, electing to receive cash, receive less than 20% of his or her entire distribution in cash. If these and certain other requirements are met, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the amount of the dividend paid in stock will be equal to the amount of cash that could have been received instead of stock. Taxable stockholders receiving such dividends will be required to include the amount of the dividends as ordinary income (or as long-term capital gain to the extent such distribution is properly reported as a capital gain dividend) to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits for United States federal income tax purposes. As a result, a U.S. stockholder may be required to pay tax with respect to such dividends in excess of any cash received. If a U.S. stockholder sells the stock it receives as a dividend in order to pay this tax, the sales proceeds may be less than the amount included in income with respect to the dividend, depending on the market price of our stock at the time of the sale. Furthermore, with respect to non-U.S. stockholders, we may be required to withhold U.S. tax with respect to such dividends, including in respect of all or a portion of such dividend that is payable in stock. In addition, if a significant number of our stockholders determine to sell shares of our stock in order to pay taxes owed on dividends, it may put downward pressure on the trading price of our stock.

We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting for 2012. Future internal control deficiencies could impact the accuracy of our financial results or prevent the detection of fraud. As a result, stockholders could lose confidence in our financial and other public reporting, which would harm our business and the trading price of our common stock.

Effective internal controls over financial reporting are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and, together with adequate disclosure controls and procedures, are designed to prevent fraud. We identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting for 2012. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. We have taken steps to remediate our internal control processes, but any failure by us to identify future deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting in a timely manner or remediate any such deficiencies, could prevent us from accurately and timely reporting our financial results. Inferior internal controls could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a negative effect on the trading price of our common stock.

We will be required to disclose changes made in our internal control and procedures on a quarterly basis and our management will be required to assess the effectiveness of these controls annually. An independent assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls could detect problems that our management’s assessment might not. Undetected material weaknesses in our internal controls could lead to financial statement restatements and require us to incur the expense of remediation. In the event

31

Table of Contents

that we are unable to maintain or achieve compliance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and related rules, the market price of our common stock may be adversely affected.

Changes in laws or regulations governing our operations may adversely affect our business or cause us to alter our business strategy.

We and our portfolio companies will be subject to applicable local, state and federal laws and regulations, including, without limitation, federal immigration laws and regulations. New legislation may be enacted or new interpretations, rulings or regulations could be adopted, including those governing the types of investments we are permitted to make, any of which could harm us and our stockholders, potentially with retroactive effect. Additionally, any changes to the laws and regulations governing our operations relating to permitted investments may cause us to alter our investment strategy in order to avail ourselves of new or different opportunities. Such changes could result in material differences to the strategies and plans set forth herein and may result in our investment focus shifting from the areas of expertise of our senior lending team and our executive committee to other types of investments in which our senior lending team and our executive committee may have less expertise or little or no experience. Thus, any such changes, if they occur, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and the value of your investment.

Curtailment of the government-guaranteed loan programs could cut off an important segment of our business.

Although the program has been in existence since 1953, there can be no assurance that the federal government will maintain the SBA program, or that it will continue to guarantee loans at current levels. If we cannot continue making and selling government-guaranteed loans, we will generate fewer origination fees and our ability to generate gains on sale of loans will decrease. From time-to-time, the government agencies that guarantee these loans reach their internal budgeted limits and cease to guarantee loans for a stated time period. In addition, these agencies may change their rules for extending loans. Also, Congress may adopt legislation that would have the effect of discontinuing or changing the programs. Non-governmental programs could replace government programs for some borrowers, but the terms might not be equally acceptable. If these changes occur, the volume of loans to SMBs and industrial borrowers of the types that now qualify for government-guaranteed loans could decline, as could the profitability of these loans.

Our business is subject to increasingly complex corporate governance, public disclosure and accounting requirements that are costly and could adversely affect our business and financial results.

As a publicly traded company, we incur legal, accounting and other expenses, including costs associated with the periodic reporting requirements applicable to a company whose securities are registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, as well as additional corporate governance requirements, including requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and other rules implemented by the SEC. Also, we are subject to changing rules and regulations of federal and state government as well as the stock exchange on which our common stock is listed. These entities, including the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, the SEC and the NASDAQ Global Select Market, have issued a significant number of new and increasingly complex requirements and regulations over the last several years and continue to develop additional regulations and requirements in response to laws enacted by Congress. For example, on July 21, 2010, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Protection Act, or the Dodd-Frank Act, was enacted. There are significant corporate governance and executive compensation-related provisions in the Dodd-Frank Act that require the SEC to adopt additional rules and regulations in these areas such as “say on pay” and proxy access. Our efforts to comply with these requirements may result in an increase in expenses and a diversion of management’s time from other business activities.
 
Although passage of the Dodd-Frank Act has resulted in extensive rulemaking and regulatory changes that affect us and the financial industry as a whole, many of its provisions remain subject to extended implementation periods and delayed effective dates and will require extensive rulemaking by regulatory authorities. While the full impact of the Dodd-Frank Act on us and our portfolio companies may not be known for an extended period of time, the Dodd-Frank Act, including future rules implementing its provisions and the interpretation of those rules, along with other legislative and regulatory proposals directed at the financial services industry or affecting taxation that are proposed or pending in the U.S. Congress, may negatively impact the operations, cash flows or financial condition of us or our portfolio companies, impose additional costs on us or our portfolio companies, intensify the regulatory supervision of us or our portfolio companies or otherwise adversely affect our business or the business of our portfolio companies.

To the extent original issue discount and PIK interest constitute a portion of our income, we will be exposed to typical risks associated with such income being required to be included in taxable and accounting income prior to receipt of cash representing such income.


32

Table of Contents

Our investments may include original issue discount, or original issue discount (“OID”), instruments and contractual PIK, interest, which represents contractual interest added to a loan balance and due at the end of such loan’s term. To the extent OID or PIK interest constitute a portion of our income, we are exposed to typical risks associated with such income being required to be included in taxable and accounting income prior to receipt of cash, including the following:

OID instruments may have higher yields, which reflect the payment deferral and credit risk associated with these instruments;

OID accruals may create uncertainty about the source of our distributions to stockholders;

OID and PIK instruments may have unreliable valuations because their continuing accruals require continuing judgments about the collectability of the deferred payments and the value of the collateral; and

OID and PIK instruments may represent a higher credit risk than coupon loans.

If we cannot obtain additional capital because of either regulatory or market price constraints, we could be forced to curtail or cease our new lending and investment activities, our net asset value could decrease and our level of distributions and liquidity could be affected adversely.

Our ability to secure additional financing and satisfy our financial obligations under indebtedness outstanding from time to time will depend upon our future operating performance, which is subject to the prevailing general economic and credit market conditions, including interest rate levels and the availability of credit generally, and financial, business and other factors, many of which are beyond our control. The prolonged continuation or worsening of current economic and capital market conditions could have a material adverse effect on our ability to secure financing on favorable terms, if at all.

If we are unable to obtain additional debt capital, then our equity investors will not benefit from the potential for increased returns on equity resulting from leverage to the extent that our investment strategy is successful and we may be limited in our ability to make new commitments or fundings to our portfolio companies.

Uncertainty about the financial stability of the United States and of several countries in the European Union (EU) could have a significant adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Due to federal budget deficit concerns, S&P downgraded the federal government’s credit rating from AAA to AA+ for the first time in history on August 5, 2011. Further, Moody’s and Fitch have warned that they may downgrade the federal government’s credit rating. Further downgrades or warnings by S&P or other rating agencies, and the government’s credit and deficit concerns in general, could cause interest rates and borrowing costs to rise, which may negatively impact both the perception of credit risk associated with our debt portfolio and our ability to access the debt markets on favorable terms. In addition, a decreased credit rating could create broader financial turmoil and uncertainty, which may weigh heavily on our financial performance and the value of our common stock.

In 2010, a financial crisis emerged in Europe, triggered by high budget deficits and rising direct and contingent sovereign debt in Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal and Spain, which created concerns about the ability of these nations to continue to service their sovereign debt obligations. Risks and ongoing concerns resulting from the debt crisis in Europe could have a detrimental impact on the global economic recovery, sovereign and non-sovereign debt in these countries and the financial condition of European financial institutions. Market and economic disruptions have affected, and may continue to affect, consumer confidence levels and spending, personal bankruptcy rates, levels of incurrence and default on consumer debt and home prices, among other factors. We cannot assure you that the market disruptions in Europe, including the increased cost of funding for certain governments and financial institutions, will not spread, and we cannot assure you that future assistance packages will be available, or if available, sufficient to stabilize the affected countries and markets in Europe or elsewhere. To the extent uncertainty regarding any economic recovery in Europe continues to negatively impact consumer confidence and consumer credit factors, our business and results of operations could be significantly and adversely affected.

In October 2014, the U.S. Federal Reserve announced that it has terminated its bond-buying program, or quantitative easing, which was designed to stimulate the economy and expand the Federal Reserve’s holdings of long-term securities until key economic indicators, such as the unemployment rate, showed signs of improvement. It is unclear what effect, if any, the Federal Reserve’s termination of quantitative easing will have on the value of our investments. However, it is possible that without quantitative easing by the Federal Reserve, these developments, along with the European sovereign debt crisis, could cause interest rates and borrowing costs to rise, which may negatively impact our ability to access the debt markets on favorable terms.

33

Table of Contents


A failure or the perceived risk of a failure to raise the statutory debt limit of the United States could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In the future, the United States federal government may not be able to meet its debt payments unless the federal debt ceiling is raised. If legislation increasing the debt ceiling is not enacted, as needed, and the debt ceiling is reached, the federal government may stop or delay making payments on its obligations. A failure by Congress to raise the debt limit would increase the risk of default by the United States on its obligations, as well as the risk of other economic dislocations.

If the U.S. government fails to complete its budget process or to provide for a continuing resolution before the expiration of the current continuing resolution, a federal government shutdown may result. Such a failure or the perceived risk of such a failure, consequently, could have a material adverse effect on the financial markets and economic conditions in the United States and throughout the world. It could also limit our ability and the ability of our portfolio companies to obtain financing, and it could have a material adverse effect on the valuation of our portfolio companies. Consequently, the continued uncertainty in the general economic environment, including the recent government shutdown and potential debt ceiling implications, as well in specific economies of several individual geographic markets in which our portfolio companies operate, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

A disruption in the capital markets and the credit markets could impair our ability to raise capital and negatively affect our business.

As a BDC, we must maintain our ability to raise additional capital for investment purposes. Without sufficient access to the capital markets or credit markets, we may be forced to curtail our business operations or we may not be able to pursue new business opportunities.

In recent years, the capital markets and the credit markets have experienced periods of extreme volatility and disruption and, accordingly, there has been and may continue to be uncertainty in the financial markets in general. Continuing U.S. debt ceiling and budget deficit concerns, including automatic spending cuts stemming from sequestration and together with deteriorating sovereign debt conditions in Europe, have increased the possibility of additional credit-rating downgrades and economic slowdowns, or a recession in the United States. The impact of this or any further downgrades to the U.S. government’s sovereign credit rating or its perceived creditworthiness could adversely affect the U.S. and global financial markets and economic conditions. Absent further quantitative easing by the Federal Reserve Board, these developments, along with the European sovereign debt crisis, could cause interest rates and borrowing costs to rise, which may negatively impact our ability to access the debt markets on favorable terms. Continued adverse economic conditions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Any further disruptive conditions in the financial industry and the impact of new legislation in response to those conditions could restrict our business operations and could adversely impact our results of operations and financial condition.

If the fair value of our assets declines substantially, we may fail to maintain the asset coverage ratios imposed upon us by the 1940 Act. Any such failure would affect our ability to issue securities, including borrowings, and pay dividends, which could materially impair our business operations. Our liquidity could be impaired further by an inability to access the capital markets or to consummate new borrowing facilities to provide capital for normal operations, including new originations. In recent years, reflecting concern about the stability of the financial markets, many lenders and institutional investors have reduced or ceased providing funding to borrowers.

We are highly dependent on information systems and systems failures could significantly disrupt our business, which may, in turn, negatively affect the market price of our common stock and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

Our business is highly dependent on our communications and information systems. Certain of these systems are provided to us by third party service providers. Any failure or interruption of such systems, including as a result of the termination of an agreement with any such third party service provider, could cause delays or other problems in our activities. This, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and negatively affect the market price of our common stock and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

Terrorist attacks, acts of war or natural disasters may affect any market for our common stock, impact the businesses in which we invest and harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

Terrorist acts, acts of war or natural disasters may disrupt our operations, as well as the operations of the businesses in which we invest. Such acts have created, and continue to create, economic and political uncertainties and have contributed to global

34

Table of Contents

economic instability. Future terrorist activities, military or security operations, or natural disasters could further weaken the domestic/global economies and create additional uncertainties, which may negatively impact the businesses in which we invest directly or indirectly and, in turn, could have a material adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition. Losses from terrorist attacks and natural disasters are generally uninsurable.
RISKS RELATING TO OUR INVESTMENTS GENERALLY

Our investments are very risky and highly speculative.

We invest primarily in senior secured term loans and select equity investments issued by companies, some of which are highly leveraged.

Senior Secured Loans. There is a risk that the collateral securing our loans, in most cases real estate, may decrease in value over time, may be difficult to sell in a timely manner, may be difficult to appraise and may fluctuate in value based upon the success of the business and market conditions, including as a result of the inability of the portfolio company to raise additional capital, and, in some circumstances, our lien could be subordinated to claims of other creditors. In addition, deterioration in a portfolio company’s financial condition and prospects, including its inability to raise additional capital, may be accompanied by deterioration in the value of the collateral for the loan. Consequently, the fact that a loan is secured does not guarantee that we will receive principal and interest payments according to the loan’s terms, or at all, or that we will be able to collect on the loan should we be forced to enforce our remedies. In some cases we may take second lien position on additional business or personal assets to secure further our first lien positions.

Equity Investments. We occasionally invest directly in the equity securities of portfolio companies. The equity interests we receive may not appreciate in value and, in fact, may decline in value. Accordingly, we may not be able to realize gains from our equity interests, and any gains that we do realize on the disposition of any equity interests may not be sufficient to offset any other losses we experience.

In addition, investing in SMBs involves a number of significant risks, including:

these companies may have limited financial resources and may be unable to meet their obligations under their debt securities that we hold, which may be accompanied by a deterioration in the value of any collateral and a reduction in the likelihood of us realizing any guarantees we may have obtained in connection with our investment;

they typically have shorter operating histories, narrower product lines and smaller market shares than larger businesses, which tend to render them more vulnerable to competitors’ actions and market conditions, as well as general economic downturns;

they are more likely to depend on the management talents and efforts of a small group of persons; therefore, the death, disability, resignation or termination of one or more of these persons could have a material adverse impact on our portfolio company and, in turn, on us;

they generally have less predictable operating results, may from time to time be parties to litigation, may be engaged in rapidly changing businesses with products subject to a substantial risk of obsolescence, and may require substantial additional capital to support their operations, finance expansion or maintain their competitive position;

they may have difficulty accessing the capital markets to meet future capital needs, which may limit their ability to grow or to repay their outstanding indebtedness upon maturity; and

our executive officers and directors may, in the ordinary course of business, be named as defendants in litigation arising from our investments in the portfolio companies.

An investment strategy focused primarily on smaller privately held companies involves a high degree of risk and presents certain challenges, including the lack of available information about these companies, a dependence on the talents and efforts of only a few key portfolio company personnel and a greater vulnerability to economic downturns.

Our portfolio will consist primarily of debt and equity investments in smaller privately-owned companies. Investing in these types of companies involves a number of significant risks. Typically, the debt in which we will invest is not initially rated by any rating agency; however, we believe that if such investments were rated, they would be below investment grade. Compared

35

Table of Contents

to larger publicly owned companies, these small companies may be in a weaker financial position and experience wider variations in their operating results, which may make them more vulnerable to economic downturns. Typically, these companies need more capital to compete; however, their access to capital is limited and their cost of capital is often higher than that of their competitors. Our portfolio companies often face intense competition from larger companies with greater financial, technical and marketing resources and their success typically depends on the managerial talents and efforts of an individual or a small group of persons. Therefore, any loss of its key employees could affect a portfolio company’s ability to compete effectively and harm its financial condition. Further, some of these companies conduct business in regulated industries that are susceptible to regulatory changes. These factors could impair the cash flow of our portfolio companies and result in other events, such as bankruptcy. These events could limit a portfolio company’s ability to repay its obligations to us, which may have an adverse effect on the return on, or the recovery of, our investment in these businesses. Deterioration in a borrower’s financial condition and prospects may be accompanied by deterioration in the value of the loan’s collateral.

Generally, little public information exists about these companies, and we are required to rely on the ability of our senior lending team and our executive committee to obtain adequate information to evaluate the potential returns from investing in these companies. If we are unable to uncover all material information about these companies, we may not make a fully informed investment decision, and we may lose money on our investments. Also, privately held companies frequently have less diverse product lines and smaller market presence than larger competitors. These factors could adversely affect our investment returns as compared to companies investing primarily in the securities of public companies.

Our investments in leveraged portfolio companies may be risky, and you could lose all or part of your investment.

Investment in leveraged companies involves a number of significant risks. Leveraged companies in which we invest may have limited financial resources and may be unable to meet their obligations under their loans and debt securities that we hold. Such developments may be accompanied by a deterioration in the value of any collateral and a reduction in the likelihood of our realizing any guarantees that we may have obtained in connection with our investment. Smaller leveraged companies also may have less predictable operating results and may require substantial additional capital to support their operations, finance their expansion or maintain their competitive position.

Our portfolio companies may incur debt that ranks equally with, or senior to, our investments in such companies.

Our portfolio companies may have, or may be permitted to incur, other debt that ranks equally with, or in some cases senior to, the debt in which we invest. By their terms, such debt instruments may entitle the holders to receive payment of interest or principal on or before the dates on which we are entitled to receive payments with respect to the debt instruments in which we invest. Also, in the event of insolvency, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or bankruptcy of a portfolio company, holders of debt instruments ranking senior to our investment in that portfolio company would typically be entitled to receive payment in full before we receive any distribution. After repaying such senior creditors, such portfolio company may not have sufficient remaining assets to repay its obligation to us. In the case of debt ranking equally with debt instruments in which we invest, we would have to share on an equal basis any distributions with other creditors holding such debt in the event of an insolvency, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or bankruptcy of the relevant portfolio company.

Second priority liens on collateral securing loans that we make to our portfolio companies may be subject to control by senior creditors with first priority liens. If there is a default, the value of the collateral may not be sufficient to repay in full both the first priority creditors and us.

Certain loans that we make are secured by a second priority security interest in the same collateral pledged by a portfolio company to secure senior first lien debt owed by the portfolio company to commercial banks or other traditional lenders. Often the senior lender has procured covenants from the portfolio company prohibiting the incurrence of additional secured debt without the senior lender’s consent. Prior to and as a condition of permitting the portfolio company to borrow money from us secured by the same collateral pledged to the senior lender, the senior lender will require assurances that it will control the disposition of any collateral in the event of bankruptcy or other default. In many such cases, the senior lender will require us to enter into an “intercreditor agreement” prior to permitting the portfolio company to borrow from us. Typically the intercreditor agreements we will be requested to expressly subordinate our debt instruments to those held by the senior lender and further provide that the senior lender shall control: (1) the commencement of foreclosure or other proceedings to liquidate and collect on the collateral; (2) the nature, timing and conduct of foreclosure or other collection proceedings; (3) the amendment of any collateral document; (4) the release of the security interests in respect of any collateral; and (5) the waiver of defaults under any security agreement. Because of the control we may cede to senior lenders under intercreditor agreements we may enter, we may be unable to realize the proceeds of any collateral securing some of our loans.


36

Table of Contents

If we make subordinated investments, the obligors or the portfolio companies may not generate sufficient cash flow to service their debt obligations to us.

We may make subordinated investments that rank below other obligations of the obligor in right of payment. Subordinated investments are subject to greater risk of default than senior obligations as a result of adverse changes in the financial condition of the obligor or economic conditions in general. If we make a subordinated investment in a portfolio company, the portfolio company may be highly leveraged, and its relatively high debt-to-equity ratio may create increased risks that its operations might not generate sufficient cash flow to service all of its debt obligations.

The disposition of our investments may result in contingent liabilities.

We currently expect that substantially all of our investments will involve loans and private securities. In connection with the disposition of an investment in loans and private securities, we may be required to make representations about the business and financial affairs of the portfolio company typical of those made in connection with the sale of a business. We may also be required to indemnify the purchasers of such investment to the extent that any such representations turn out to be inaccurate or with respect to potential liabilities. These arrangements may result in contingent liabilities that ultimately result in funding obligations that we must satisfy through our return of distributions previously made to us.

There may be circumstances where our debt investments could be subordinated to claims of other creditors or we could be subject to lender liability claims.

Even though we may have structured certain of our investments as secured loans, if one of our portfolio companies were to go bankrupt, depending on the facts and circumstances, and based upon principles of equitable subordination as defined by existing case law, a bankruptcy court could subordinate all or a portion of our claim to that of other creditors and transfer any lien securing such subordinated claim to the bankruptcy estate. The principles of equitable subordination defined by case law have generally indicated that a claim may be subordinated only if its holder is guilty of misconduct or where the senior loan is re-characterized as an equity investment and the senior lender has actually provided significant managerial assistance to the bankrupt debtor. We may also be subject to lender liability claims for actions taken by us with respect to a borrower’s business or instances where we exercise control over the borrower. It is possible that we could become subject to a lender’s liability claim, including as a result of actions taken in rendering significant managerial assistance or actions to compel and collect payments from the borrower outside the ordinary course of business.

Economic recessions could impair our portfolio companies and harm our operating results.

Certain of our portfolio companies may be susceptible to an economic downturn and may be unable to repay our loans during this period. Therefore, assets may become non-performing and the value of our portfolio may decrease during this period. The adverse economic conditions also may decrease the value of collateral securing some of our loans and the value of our equity investments. A recession could lead to financial losses in our portfolio and a decrease in revenues, net income and the value of our assets.

The lack of liquidity in our investments may adversely affect our business.

We generally invest in companies whose securities are not publicly traded, and whose securities will be subject to legal and other restrictions on resale or will otherwise be less liquid than publicly traded securities. There is no established trading market for the securities in which we invest. The illiquidity of these investments may make it difficult for us to sell these investments when desired. In addition, if we are required to liquidate all or a portion of our portfolio quickly, we may realize significantly less than the value at which we had previously recorded these investments. As a result, we do not expect to achieve liquidity in our investments in the near-term. Further, we may face other restrictions on our ability to liquidate an investment in a portfolio company to the extent that we have material non-public information regarding such portfolio company.

Our failure to make follow-on investments in our portfolio companies could impair the value of our portfolio.

Following an initial investment in a portfolio company, we may make additional investments in that portfolio company as “follow-on” investments, in order to: (1) increase or maintain in whole or in part our equity ownership percentage; (2) exercise warrants, options or convertible securities that were acquired in the original or a subsequent financing; or (3) attempt to preserve or enhance the value of our investment. We may elect not to make follow-on investments or otherwise lack sufficient funds to make those investments. We will have the discretion to make any follow-on investments, subject to the availability of capital resources. The failure to make follow-on investments may, in some circumstances, jeopardize the continued viability of a portfolio company and our initial investment, or may result in a missed opportunity for us to increase our participation in a

37

Table of Contents

successful operation. Even if we have sufficient capital to make a desired follow-on investment, we may elect not to make a follow-on investment because we do not want to increase our concentration of risk, we prefer other opportunities, we are subject to BDC requirements that would prevent such follow-on investments, or the follow-on investment would affect our qualification as a RIC.

Our portfolio may lack diversification among portfolio companies which may subject us to a risk of significant loss if one or more of these companies defaults on its obligations under any of its debt instruments.

Our portfolio may hold a limited number of portfolio companies. Beyond the asset diversification requirements associated with our qualification as a RIC under the Code, we will not have fixed guidelines for diversification, and our investments may be concentrated in relatively few companies. As our portfolio is less diversified than the portfolios of some larger funds, we are more susceptible to failure if a single loan fails. Similarly, the aggregate returns we realize may be significantly adversely affected if a small number of investments perform poorly or if we need to write down the value of any one investment.

We are a non-diversified investment company within the meaning of the 1940 Act, and therefore we may invest a significant portion of our assets in a relatively small number of issuers, which subjects us to a risk of significant loss if any of these
issuers defaults on its obligations under any of its debt instruments or as a result of a downturn in the particular industry.

We are classified as a non-diversified investment company within the meaning of the 1940 Act, and therefore we may invest a significant portion of our assets in a relatively small number of issuers in a limited number of industries. As of December 31, 2014, our two largest investments, Newtek Merchant Solutions and Newtek Technology Solutions, equaled approximately 15% and 7%, respectively, of the fair value of our total assets. Beyond the asset diversification requirements associated with our qualification as a RIC, we do not have fixed guidelines for diversification, and while we are not targeting any specific industries, relatively few industries may become significantly represented among our investments. To the extent that we assume large positions in the securities of a small number of issuers, our net asset value may fluctuate to a greater extent than that of a diversified investment company as a result of changes in the financial condition or the market’s assessment of the issuer, changes in fair value over time or a downturn in any particular industry. We may also be more susceptible to any single economic or regulatory occurrence than a diversified investment company.

Our portfolio may be concentrated in a limited number of industries, which may subject us to a risk of significant loss if there is a downturn in a particular industry in which a number of our investments are concentrated.

Our portfolio may be concentrated in a limited number of industries. A downturn in any particular industry in which we are invested could significantly impact the aggregate returns we realize. If an industry in which we have significant investments suffers from adverse business or economic conditions, as these industries have to varying degrees, a material portion of our investment portfolio could be affected adversely, which, in turn, could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.

Because we may not hold controlling equity interests in certain of our portfolio companies, we may not be in a position to exercise control over our portfolio companies or to prevent decisions by management of our portfolio companies that could decrease the value of our investments.

We do not currently hold controlling equity positions in the majority of our portfolio companies where our investments are in the form of debt, particularly SBA loans. As a result, we are subject to the risk that a portfolio company may make business decisions with which we disagree, and that the management and/or stockholders of a portfolio company may take risks or otherwise act in ways that are adverse to our interests. Due to the lack of liquidity of the debt and equity investments that we typically hold in our portfolio companies, we may not be able to dispose of our investments in the event we disagree with the actions of a portfolio company and may therefore suffer a decrease in the value of our investments.

Defaults by our portfolio companies will harm our operating results.

A portfolio company’s failure to satisfy financial or operating covenants imposed by us or other lenders could lead to defaults and, potentially, termination of its loans and foreclosure on its secured assets, which could trigger cross-defaults under other agreements and jeopardize our portfolio company’s ability to meet its obligations under the debt securities that we hold. We may incur expenses to the extent necessary to seek recovery upon default or to negotiate new terms with a defaulting portfolio company. Any extension or restructuring of our loans could adversely affect our cash flows. In addition, if one of our portfolio companies were to go bankrupt, even though we may have structured our interest as senior debt, depending on the facts and circumstances, including the extent to which we actually provided managerial assistance to that portfolio company, a

38

Table of Contents

bankruptcy court might recharacterize our debt holding and subordinate all or a portion of our claim to that of other creditors. If any of these occur, it could materially and adversely affect our operating results and cash flows.

If we and our portfolio companies are unable to protect our intellectual property rights, our business and prospects could be harmed, and if we and our portfolio companies are required to devote significant resources to protecting their intellectual property rights, the value of our investment could be reduced.

The proprietary software essential to our business and that of our controlled portfolio companies is owned by us and made available to them for their use. Our future success and competitive position will depend in part upon our ability to maintain and protect proprietary technology used in our products and services. We will rely, in part, on patent, trade secret and trademark law to protect that technology, but competitors may misappropriate our intellectual property, and disputes as to ownership of intellectual property may arise. We may, from time to time, be required to institute litigation to enforce the patents, copyrights or other intellectual property rights, protect trade secrets, determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others or defend against claims of infringement. Such litigation could result in substantial costs and diversion of resources.

Prepayments of our debt investments by our portfolio companies could adversely impact our results of operations and reduce our return on equity.

We will be subject to the risk that the investments we make in our portfolio companies may be repaid prior to maturity; our SBA loans do not carry prepayment penalties. When this occurs, we will generally reinvest these proceeds in temporary investments or repay outstanding debt, depending on future investment in new portfolio companies. Temporary investments will typically have substantially lower yields than the debt being prepaid and we could experience significant delays in reinvesting these amounts. Any future investment in a new portfolio company may also be at lower yields than the debt that was repaid. As a result, our results of operations could be materially adversely affected if one or more of our portfolio companies elect to prepay amounts owed to us. Additionally, prepayments could negatively impact our return on equity, which could result in a decline in the market price of our common stock.

We may not realize gains from our equity investments.

Certain investments that we may make in the future include warrants or other equity securities. Investments in equity securities involve a number of significant risks, including the risk of further dilution as a result of additional issuances, inability to access additional capital and failure to pay current distributions. Investments in preferred securities involve special risks, such as the risk of deferred distributions, credit risk, illiquidity and limited voting rights. In addition, we may from time to time make non-control, equity investments in portfolio companies. Our goal is ultimately to realize gains upon our disposition of such equity interests. However, the equity interests we receive may not appreciate in value and, in fact, may decline in value. Accordingly, we may not be able to realize gains from our equity interests, and any gains that we do realize on the disposition of any equity interests may not be sufficient to offset any other losses we experience. We also may be unable to realize any value if a portfolio company does not have a liquidity event, such as a sale of the business, recapitalization or public offering, which would allow us to sell the underlying equity interests. We will often seek puts or similar rights to give us the right to sell our equity securities back to the portfolio company issuer. We may be unable to exercise these puts rights for the consideration provided in our investment documents if the issuer is in financial distress.

We may expose ourselves to risks if we engage in hedging transactions.

If we engage in hedging transactions, we may expose ourselves to certain risks associated with such transactions. We may utilize instruments such as forward contracts, currency options and interest rate swaps, caps, collars and floors to seek to hedge against fluctuations in the relative values of our portfolio positions from changes in currency exchange rates and market interest rates. Hedging against a decline in the values of our portfolio positions does not eliminate the possibility of fluctuations in the values of such positions or prevent losses if the values of such positions decline. However, such hedging can establish other positions designed to gain from those same developments, thereby offsetting the decline in the value of such portfolio positions. Such hedging transactions may also limit the opportunity for gain if the values of the underlying portfolio positions increase. It may not be possible to hedge against an exchange rate or interest rate fluctuation that is so generally anticipated that we are not able to enter into a hedging transaction at an acceptable price. Moreover, for a variety of reasons, we may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Any such imperfect correlation may prevent us from achieving the intended hedge and expose us to risk of loss. In addition, it may not be possible to hedge fully or perfectly against currency fluctuations affecting the value of securities denominated in non-U.S. currencies because the value of those securities is likely to fluctuate as a result of factors not related to currency fluctuations.

We have specific risks associated with SBA loans.

39

Table of Contents


We have generally sold the guaranteed portion of SBA loans in the secondary market. Such sales have resulted in our earning premiums and creating a stream of servicing income. There can be no assurance that we will be able to continue originating these loans, or that a secondary market will exist for, or that we will continue to realize premiums upon the sale of the guaranteed portions of the SBA 7(a) loans.

Since we sell the guaranteed portion of substantially all of our SBA 7(a) loan portfolio, we retain credit risk on the non-guaranteed portion of the SBA loans. We share pro rata with the SBA in any recoveries. In the event of default on an SBA loan, our pursuit of remedies against a borrower is subject to SBA approval, and where the SBA establishes that its loss is attributable to deficiencies in the manner in which the loan application has been prepared, submitted and approved, the SBA may decline to honor its guarantee with respect to our SBA loans or it may seek the recovery of damages from us. If we should experience significant problems with our underwriting of SBA loans, such failure to honor a guarantee or the cost to correct the problems could have a material adverse effect on us.

An increase in non-performing assets would reduce our income and increase our expenses.

If our level of non-performing assets in our SBA lending business rises in the future, it could adversely affect our revenue and earnings. Non-performing assets are primarily loans on which borrowers are not making their required payments. Non-performing assets also include loans that have been restructured to permit the borrower to have smaller payments and real estate that has been acquired through foreclosure of unpaid loans. To the extent that our financial assets are non-performing, we will have less cash available for lending and other activities.

Our reserve for credit losses may not be sufficient to cover unexpected losses.
Our business depends on the behavior of our customers. In addition to our credit practices and procedures, we maintain a reserve for credit losses on our SBA loans, which management has judged to be adequate given the loans we originate. We periodically review our reserve for adequacy considering current economic conditions and trends, collateral values, charge-off experience, levels of past due loans and non-performing assets, and we adjust our reserve accordingly. However, because of the poor current economic conditions caused by the recession, our reserves may prove inadequate, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. As a BDC, we will no longer record reserves as all of our loans will be marked to market or carried at fair value.
If the assets securing the loans that we make decrease in value, then we may lack sufficient collateral to cover losses.
To attempt to mitigate credit risks, we will typically take a security interest in the available assets of our portfolio companies. There is no assurance that we will obtain or properly perfect our liens.
There is a risk that the collateral securing our loans may decrease in value over time, may be difficult to sell in a timely manner, may be difficult to appraise and may fluctuate in value based upon the success of the business and market conditions, including as a result of the inability of a portfolio company to raise additional capital. In some circumstances, our lien could be subordinated to claims of other creditors. Consequently, the fact that a loan is secured does not guarantee that we will receive principal and interest payments according to the loan’s terms, or that we will be able to collect on the loan should we be forced to enforce our remedies.
In addition, because we may invest in technology-related companies, a substantial portion of the assets securing our investment may be in the form of intellectual property, if any, inventory and equipment and, to a lesser extent, cash and accounts receivable. Intellectual property, if any, that is securing our loan could lose value if, among other things, the company’s rights to the intellectual property are challenged or if the company’s license to the intellectual property is revoked or expires, the technology fails to achieve its intended results or a new technology makes the intellectual property functionally obsolete. Inventory may not be adequate to secure our loan if our valuation of the inventory at the time that we made the loan was not accurate or if there is a reduction in the demand for the inventory.
Similarly, any equipment securing our loan may not provide us with the anticipated security if there are changes in technology or advances in new equipment that render the particular equipment obsolete or of limited value, or if the company fails to adequately maintain or repair the equipment. Any one or more of the preceding factors could materially impair our ability to recover principal in a foreclosure.
We could be adversely affected by weakness in the residential housing and commercial real estate markets.

Continued weakness in residential home and commercial real estate values could impair our ability to collect on defaulted SBA loans as real estate is pledged in many of our SBA loans as part of the collateral package.

40

Table of Contents

RISKS RELATING TO OUR CONTROLLED PORTFOLIO COMPANIES - NEWTEK MERCHANT SOLUTIONS (NMS)

We could be adversely affected if either of NMS’s two bank sponsors is terminated.

NMS relies on two bank sponsors, which have substantial discretion with respect to certain elements of our electronic payment processing business practices, in order to process bankcard transactions. If either of the sponsorships is terminated, and we are not able to secure or transfer the respective merchant portfolio to a new bank sponsor or sponsors, the business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of electronic payment processing business could be materially adversely affected. If both sponsorships are terminated, and NMS is not able to secure or transfer the merchant portfolios to new bank sponsors, NMS will not be able to conduct its electronic payment processing business. NMS also relies on service providers who are critical to its business.

Because NMS is not a bank, it is unable to belong to and directly access the Visa® and MasterCard® bankcard associations. The Visa® and MasterCard® operating regulations require NMS to be sponsored by a bank in order to process bankcard transactions. NMS is currently sponsored by two banks. If both the sponsorships are terminated and NMS is unable to secure a bank sponsor for the merchant portfolios, it will not be able to process bankcard transactions for the affected portfolios. Consequently, the loss of both of NMS’s sponsorships would have a material adverse effect on our business. Furthermore, NMS’s agreement with sponsoring banks gives the sponsoring banks substantial discretion in approving certain elements of its business practices, including its solicitation, application and qualification procedures for merchants, the terms of our agreements with merchants, the processing fees that we charge, its customer service levels and its use of independent sales organizations and independent sales agents. We cannot guarantee that NMS’s sponsoring banks’ actions under these agreements will not be detrimental to us.

Other service providers, some of whom are NMS’s competitors, are necessary for the conduct of NMS’s business. The termination by service providers of these arrangements with NMS or their failure to perform these services efficiently and effectively may adversely affect NMS’s relationships with the merchants whose accounts it serves and may cause those merchants to terminate their processing agreements with NMS.

If NMS or its processors or bank sponsors fail to adhere to the standards of the Visa® and MasterCard® bankcard associations, its registrations with these associations could be terminated and it could be required to stop providing payment processing services for Visa® and MasterCard®.

Substantially all of the transactions NMS processes involve Visa® or MasterCard®. If NMS, its bank sponsors or its processors fail to comply with the applicable requirements of the Visa® and MasterCard® bankcard associations, Visa® or MasterCard® could suspend or terminate its registration. The termination of NMS’s registration or any changes in the Visa® or MasterCard® rules that would impair its registration could require it to stop providing payment processing services, which would have a material adverse effect on its business.

On occasion, NMS experiences increases in interchange and sponsorship fees. If it cannot pass along these increases to its merchants, its profit margins will be reduced.

Our electronic payment processing portfolio company pays interchange fees or assessments to bankcard associations for each transaction it processes using their credit, debit and gift cards. From time to time, the bankcard associations increase the interchange fees that they charge processors and the sponsoring banks, which generally pass on such increases to NMS. From time to time, the sponsoring banks increase their fees as well. If NMS is not able to pass these fee increases along to merchants through corresponding increases in its processing fees, its profit margins in this line of business will be reduced.

Unauthorized disclosure of merchant or cardholder data, whether through breach of our computer systems or otherwise, could expose us to liability and business losses.

Through NMS, we collect and store sensitive data about merchants and cardholders, and we maintain a database of cardholder data relating to specific transactions, including payment, card numbers and cardholder addresses, in order to process the transactions and for fraud prevention and other internal processes. If anyone penetrates our network security or otherwise misappropriates sensitive merchant or cardholder data, we could be subject to liability or business interruption. While we subject these systems to periodic independent testing and review, we cannot guarantee that our systems will not be penetrated in the future. If a breach of our system occurs, we may be subject to liability, including claims for unauthorized purchases with misappropriated card information, impersonation or other similar fraud claims. Similar risks exist with regard to the storage and transmission of such data by our processors. In the event of any such a breach, we may also be subject to a class action lawsuit.

41

Table of Contents

SMBs are less prepared for the complexities of safeguarding cardholder data than their larger counterparts. In the event of noncompliance by a customer of card industry rules, we could face fines from payment card networks. There can be no assurance that we would be able to recover any such fines from such customer.

NMS is liable if its processing merchants refuse or cannot reimburse charge-backs resolved in favor of their customers.

If a billing dispute between a merchant and a cardholder is not ultimately resolved in favor of the merchant, the disputed transaction is “charged back” to the merchant’s bank and credited to the account of the cardholder. If NMS or our processing banks are unable to collect the charge-back from the merchant’s account, or if the merchant refuses or is financially unable due to bankruptcy or other reasons to reimburse the merchant’s bank for the charge-back, NMS must bear the loss for the amount of the refund paid to the cardholder’s bank. Most of NMS’s merchants deliver products or services when purchased, so a contingent liability for charge-backs is unlikely to arise, and credits are issued on returned items. However, some of its merchants do not provide services until sometime after a purchase, which increases the potential for contingent liability and future charge backs. NMS and the sponsoring bank can require that merchants maintain cash reserves under our control to cover charge back liabilities but such reserves may not be sufficient to cover the liability or may not even be available to us in the event of a bankruptcy or other legal action.

NMS has potential liability for customer or merchant fraud.

Credit card fraud occurs when a merchant’s customer uses a stolen card (or a stolen card number in a card-not-present transaction) to purchase merchandise or services. In a traditional card-present transaction, if the merchant swipes the card, receives authorization for the transaction from the card issuing bank and verifies the signature on the back of the card against the paper receipt signed by the customer, the card issuing bank remains liable for any loss. In a fraudulent card-not-present transaction, even if the merchant receives authorization for the transaction, the merchant is liable for any loss arising from the transaction. Many NMS customers are small and transact a substantial percentage of their sales over the Internet or by telephone or mail orders. Because their sales are card-not-present transactions, these merchants are more vulnerable to customer fraud than larger merchants, and NMS could experience charge-backs arising from cardholder fraud more frequently with these merchants.

Merchant fraud occurs when a merchant, rather than a customer, knowingly uses a stolen or counterfeit card or card number to record a false sales transaction or intentionally fails to deliver the merchandise or services sold in an otherwise valid transaction. Anytime a merchant is unable to satisfy a charge-back, NMS is ultimately responsible for that charge-back unless it has required that a cash reserve be established. We cannot assure that the systems and procedures we have established to detect and reduce the impact of merchant fraud are or will be effective. Failure to effectively manage risk and prevent fraud could increase NMS charge-back liability and adversely affect our results of operations.

NMS payment processing systems may fail due to factors beyond its control, which could interrupt its business or cause it to lose business and likely increase costs.

NMS depends on the uninterrupted operations of our computer network systems, software and our processors’ data centers. Defects in these systems or damage to them due to factors beyond its control could cause severe disruption to NMS’s business and other material adverse effects on its payment processing businesses.

The electronic payment processing business is undergoing very rapid technological changes which may make it difficult or impossible for NMS to compete effectively.

The introduction of new technologies, primarily mobile payment capabilities, and the entry into the payment processing market of new competitors, Apple, Inc., for example, could dramatically change the competitive environment and require significant changes and costs for NMS to remain competitive. There is no assurance that NMS will have the capability to stay competitive with such changes.

NMS and others in the payment processing industry have come under increasing pressures from various regulatory agencies seeking to use the leverage of the payment processing business to limit or modify the practices of merchants which could lead to increased costs.

Various agencies, particularly the Federal Trade Commission, have within the past few years attempted to pressure merchants to discontinue or modify various sales or other practices. As a part of the payment processing industry, processors such as NMS could experience pressure and/or litigation aimed at restricting access to credit card sales by such merchants. These efforts

42

Table of Contents

could cause an increase in the cost to NMS of doing business or otherwise make its business less profitable and may subject NMS and others to attempts to assess penalties for not taking actions deemed sufficiently aggressive to limit such practices.

Increased regulatory focus on the payments industry may result in costly new compliance burdens on NMS’ clients and on NMS itself, leading to increased costs and decreased payments volume and revenues.

Regulation of the payments industry has increased significantly in recent years. Complying with these and other regulations increases costs and can reduce revenue opportunities. Similarly, the impact of such regulations on clients may reduce the volume of payments processed. Moreover, such regulations can limit the types of products and services that offered. Any of these occurrences can materially and adversely affect NMS’ business, prospects for future growth, financial condition and results of operations.

Examples include:

Data Protection and Information Security. Aspects of NMS’ operations and business are subject to privacy and data protection regulation. NMS’ financial institution clients are subject to similar requirements under the guidelines issued by the federal banking agencies. In addition, many individual states have enacted legislation requiring consumer notification in the event of a security breach.

Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorism Financing. The U.S.A. PATRIOT Act requires NMS to maintain an anti-money laundering program. Sanctions imposed by the U.S. Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control, or OFAC, restrict NMS from dealing with certain parties considered to be connected with money laundering, terrorism or narcotics. NMS has controls in place designed to ensure OFAC compliance, but if those controls should fail, it could be subject to penalties, reputational damage and loss of business.

Money Transfer Regulations. As NMS expands its product offerings, it may become subject to money transfer regulations, increasing regulatory oversight and costs of compliance.

Formal Investigation. If NMS is suspected of violating government statutes, such as the Federal Trade Commission Act or the Telemarketing and Consumer Fraud and Abuse Prevention Act, governmental agencies may formally investigate NMS. As a result of such a formal investigation, criminal or civil charges could be filed against NMS and it could be required to pay significant fines or penalties in connection with such investigation or other governmental investigations. Any criminal or civil charges by a governmental agency, including any fines or penalties, could materially harm NMS’ business, results of operations, financial position and cash flows. Currently, NMS is subject to a complaint issued by the Federal Trade Commission.
RISKS RELATING TO OUR CONTROLLED PORTFOLIO COMPANIES - NEWTEK MANAGED TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS (NTS)

NTS operates in a highly competitive industry in which technological change can be rapid.

The information technology business and its related technology involve a broad range of rapidly changing technologies. NTS equipment and the technologies on which it is based may not remain competitive over time, and others may develop superior technologies that render its products non-competitive, without significant additional capital expenditures. Some of NTS’s competitors are significantly larger and have substantially greater market presence as well as greater financial, technical, operational, marketing and other resources and experience than NTS. In the event that such a competitor expends significant sales and marketing resources in one or several markets, NTS may not be able to compete successfully in such markets. We believe that competition will continue to increase, placing downward pressure on prices. Such pressure could adversely affect NTS gross margins if it is not able to reduce its costs commensurate with such price reductions. There can be no assurances that NTS will remain competitive.

NTS’s managed technology solutions business depends on the efficient and uninterrupted operation of its computer and communications hardware systems and infrastructure.

Despite precautions taken by NTS against possible failure of its systems, interruptions could result from natural disasters, power loss, the inability to acquire fuel for its backup generators, telecommunications failure, terrorist attacks and similar events. NTS also leases telecommunications lines from local, regional and national carriers whose service may be interrupted. NTS’s business, financial condition and results of operations could be harmed by any damage or failure that interrupts or delays

43

Table of Contents

its operations. There can be no assurance that its insurance will cover all of the losses or compensate NTS for the possible loss of clients occurring during any period that NTS is unable to provide service.

NTS’s inability to maintain the integrity of its infrastructure and the privacy of confidential information would materially affect its business.

The NTS infrastructure is potentially vulnerable to physical or electronic break-ins, viruses or similar problems. If its security measures are circumvented, it could jeopardize the security of confidential information stored on NTS’s systems, misappropriate proprietary information or cause interruptions in NTS’s operations. We may be required to make significant additional investments and efforts to protect against or remedy security breaches. Security breaches that result in access to confidential information could damage our reputation and expose us to a risk of loss or liability. The security services that NTS offers in connection with customers’ networks cannot assure complete protection from computer viruses, break-ins and other disruptive problems. The occurrence of these problems may result in claims against NTS or us or liability on our part. These claims, regardless of their ultimate outcome, could result in costly litigation and could harm our business and reputation and impair NTS’s ability to attract and retain customers.

NTS’s business depends on Microsoft Corporation and others for the licenses to use software as well as other intellectual property in the managed technology solutions business.

NTS’s managed technology business is built on technological platforms relying on the Microsoft Windows® products and other intellectual property that NTS currently licenses. As a result, if NTS is unable to continue to have the benefit of those licensing arrangements or if the products upon which its platform is built become obsolete, its business could be materially and adversely affected.
RISKS RELATING TO OUR CONTROLLED PORTFOLIO COMPANIES - INSURANCE AGENCY BUSINESS (NIA)

NIA depends on third parties, particularly property and casualty insurance companies, to supply the products marketed by its agents.

NIA contracts with property and casualty insurance companies typically provide that the contracts can be terminated by the supplier without cause. NIA’s inability to enter into satisfactory arrangements with these suppliers or the loss of these relationships for any reason would adversely affect the results of its new insurance business. Also, NIA’s inability to obtain these products at competitive prices could make it difficult for it to compete with larger and better capitalized providers of such insurance services.

If NIA fails to comply with government regulations, its insurance agency business would be adversely affected.

NIA insurance agency business is subject to comprehensive regulation in the various states in which it conducts business. NIA’s success will depend in part upon its ability to satisfy these regulations and to obtain and maintain all required licenses and permits. NIA’s failure to comply with any statutes and regulations could have a material adverse effect on it. Furthermore, the adoption of additional statutes and regulations, changes in the interpretation and enforcement of current statutes and regulations could have a material adverse effect on it.

NIA does not have any control over the commissions it earns on the sale of insurance products which are based on premiums and commission rates set by insurers and the conditions prevalent in the insurance market.

NIA earns commissions on the sale of insurance products. Commission rates and premiums can change based on the prevailing economic and competitive factors that affect insurance underwriters. In addition, the insurance industry has been characterized by periods of intense price competition due to excessive underwriting capacity and periods of favorable premium levels due to shortages of capacity. We cannot predict the timing or extent of future changes in commission rates or premiums or the effect any of these changes will have on the operations of NIA’s insurance agency.
RISKS RELATING TO OUR CONTROLLED PORTFOLIO COMPANIES - PAYROLL PROCESSING BUSINESS (NPS)

Unauthorized disclosure of employee data, whether through a cyber-security breach of our computer systems or otherwise, could expose NPS to liability and business losses.

44

Table of Contents


NPS collects and stores sensitive data about individuals in order to process the transactions and for other internal processes. If anyone penetrates its network security or otherwise misappropriates sensitive individual data, NPS could be subject to liability or business interruption. NPS is subject to laws and rules issued by different agencies concerning safeguarding and maintaining the confidentiality of this information. Its activities have been, and will continue to be, subject to an increasing risk of cyber-attacks, the nature of which is continually evolving. Cyber-security risks include unauthorized access to privileged and sensitive customer information, including passwords and account information of NPS’ customers. While it subjects its data systems to periodic independent testing and review, NPS cannot guarantee that its systems will not be penetrated in the future. Experienced computer programmers and hackers may be able to penetrate NPS’ network security, and misappropriate or compromise our confidential information, create system disruptions, or cause shutdowns. As a result, NPS’ customers’ information may be lost, disclosed, accessed or taken without our customers’ consent. If a breach of NPS’ system occurs, it may be subject to liability, including claims for impersonation or other similar fraud claims. In the event of any such a breach, NPS may also be subject to a class action lawsuit. Any significant violations of data privacy could result in the loss of business, litigation and regulatory investigations and penalties that could damage NPS’ reputation, and the growth of its business could be adversely affected.

NPS’ systems may be subject to disruptions that could adversely affect its business and reputation.

NPS’ payroll business relies heavily on its payroll, financial, accounting and other data processing systems. If any of these systems or any of the vendors which supply them fails to operate properly or becomes disabled even for a brief period of time, NPS could suffer financial loss, a disruption of its business, liability to clients, regulatory intervention or damage to its reputation. NPS has disaster recovery plans in place to protect its businesses against natural disasters, security breaches, military or terrorist actions, power or communication failures or similar events. Despite NPS’ preparations, its disaster recovery plans may not be successful in preventing the loss of client data, service interruptions, and disruptions to its operations or damage to its important facilities.

If NPS fails to adapt its technology to meet client needs and preferences, the demand for its services may diminish.

NPS operates in industries that are subject to rapid technological advances and changing client needs and preferences. In order to remain competitive and responsive to client demands, NPS continually upgrades, enhances and expands its existing solutions and services. If NPS fails to respond successfully to technology challenges, the demand for its services may diminish.

NPS could incur unreimbursed costs or damages due to delays in processing inherent in the banking system.
NPS generally determines the availability of customer (employer) funds prior to making payments to employees or taxing authorities, and such employer funds are generally transferred in to its accounts prior to making payments out. Due to the structure of the banking system however, there are times when NPS may make payroll or tax payments and not immediately receive the funds to do so from the employer. There can be no assurance that the procedures NPS has in place to prevent these occurrences or mitigate the damages will be sufficient to prevent loss to its business.
RISKS RELATING TO OUR CONTROLLED PORTFOLIO COMPANIES - RECEIVABLES FINANCING AND SERVICING BUSINESS (NBC)

An unexpected level of defaults in NBC’s accounts receivables portfolio would reduce its income and increase its expenses.

If NBC’s level of non-performing assets in its receivable financing business rises in the future, it could adversely affect its revenue, earnings and cash flow. Non-performing assets primarily consist of receivables for which the customer has not made timely payment. In certain situations, NBC may restructure the receivable to permit such a customer to have smaller payments over a longer period of time. Such a restructuring or non-payment by a receivables customer will result in lower revenue and less cash available for NBC’s operational activities.

NBC’s reserve for credit losses may not be sufficient to cover unexpected losses.

NBC’s business depends on the behavior of its customers. In addition to its credit practices and procedures, NBC maintains a reserve for credit losses on its accounts receivable portfolio, which it has judged to be adequate given the receivables it purchases. CDS periodically reviews its reserve for adequacy considering current economic conditions and trends, charge-off experience and levels of non-performing assets, and adjusts its reserve accordingly. However, because of recent unstable economic conditions, its reserves may prove inadequate, which could have a material adverse effect on its financial condition and results of operations.

45

Table of Contents


NBC depends on outside financing to support its receivables financing business.

NBC’s receivables financing business depends on outside financing to support its acquisition of receivables. Termination of the credit lines for any reason would have a material adverse effect on its business, including but not limited to, the liquidation of its receivables portfolios to pay down the lines. If funds from such sale were insufficient to completely pay down the line of credit, NBC would be responsible for any short fall. In particular, NBC depends on a line of credit which matures in February 2016. Loss of this line and NBC’s inability to replace it would materially impact the business.
RISKS RELATING TO OUR CAPCO BUSINESS

The Capco programs and the tax credits they provide are created by state legislation and implemented through regulation, and such laws and rules are subject to possible action to repeal or retroactively revise the programs for political, economic or other reasons. Such an attempted repeal or revision would create substantial difficulty for the Capco programs and could, if ultimately successful, cause us material financial harm.

The tax credits associated with the Capco programs and provided to our Capcos’ investors are to be utilized by the investors over a period of time, which is typically ten years. Much can change during such a period and it is possible that one or more states may revise or eliminate the tax credits. Any such revision or repeal could have a material adverse economic impact on our Capcos, either directly or as a result of the Capco’s insurer’s actions. Any such final state action that jeopardizes the tax credits could result in the provider of our Capco insurance assuming partial of full control of the particular Capco in order to minimize its liability under the Capco insurance policies issued to our investors.

Because our Capcos are subject to requirements under state law, a failure of any of them to meet these requirements could subject the Capco and our stockholders to the loss of one or more Capcos.

Despite the fact that we have met all applicable minimum requirements of the Capco programs in which we still participate, each Capco remains subject to state regulation until it has invested 100 percent of its funds and otherwise remained in full legal compliance. There can be no assurance that we will continue to be able to do so. A major regulatory violation, while not fatal to our Capco business, would materially increase the cost of operating the Capcos.
RISKS RELATING TO OUR COMMON STOCK
Two of our stockholders, one a current and one a former executive officer, beneficially own approximately 19% of our common stock, and are able to exercise significant influence over the outcome of most stockholder actions.
Although there is no agreement or understanding between them, because of their ownership of our stock, Barry Sloane, our Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President, and Jeffrey G. Rubin, former president of the Company, will be able to have significant influence over actions requiring stockholder approval, including the election of directors, the adoption of amendments to the certificate of incorporation, approval of stock incentive plans and approval of major transactions such as a merger or sale of assets. This could delay or prevent a change in control of our company, deprive our stockholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their common stock as part of a change in control and have a negative effect on the market price of our common stock.
Our common stock price may be volatile and may decrease substantially.
The trading price of our common stock may fluctuate substantially. The price of our common stock may be higher or lower depending on many factors, some of which are beyond our control and may not be directly related to our operating performance. These factors include, but are not limited to, the following:
price and volume fluctuations in the overall stock market from time to time;
investor demand for our stock;
significant volatility in the market price and trading volume of securities of business development companies or

46

Table of Contents

other companies in our sector, which are not necessarily related to the operating performance of these companies;
changes in regulatory policies or tax guidelines with respect to RICs, BDCs, or SBICs;
failure to qualify as a RIC, or the loss of RIC status;
any shortfall in revenue or net income or any increase in losses from levels expected by investors or securities analysts;
changes, or perceived changes, in the value of our portfolio investments;
departures of key Newtek personnel;
operating performance of companies comparable to us; or
general economic conditions and trends and other external factors.
In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been brought against that company. Due to the potential volatility of our stock price once a market for our stock is established, we may become the target of securities litigation in the future. Securities litigation could result in substantial costs and divert management’s attention and resources from our business.
Future issuances of our common stock or other securities, including preferred shares, may dilute the per share book value of our common stock or have other adverse consequences to our common stockholders.
Our board of directors has the authority, without the action or vote of our stockholders, to issue all or part of the approximately 190,000,000 authorized but unissued shares of our common stock. Our business strategy relies upon investments in and acquisitions of businesses using the resources available to us, including our common stock. We have made acquisitions during each of the years from 2002 to 2005 involving the issuance of our common stock and we expect to make additional acquisitions in the future using our common stock. Additionally, we anticipate granting additional options or restricted stock awards to our employees and directors in the future. We may also issue additional securities, through public or private offerings, in order to raise capital. Future issuances of our common stock will dilute the percentage of ownership interest of current stockholders and could decrease the per share book value of our common stock. In addition, option holders may exercise their options at a time when we would otherwise be able to obtain additional equity capital on more favorable terms.

Pursuant to our amended and restated charter, our board of directors is authorized to may classify any unissued shares of stock and reclassify any previously classified but unissued shares of stock of any class or series from time to time, into one or more classes or series of stock, including Preferred Stock. If we issue preferred stock, the preferred stock would rank “senior” to common stock in our capital structure, preferred stockholders would have separate voting rights on certain matters and might have other rights, preferences, or privileges more favorable than those of our common stockholders, and the issuance of preferred stock could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a transaction or a change of control that might involve a premium price for holders of our common stock or otherwise be in your best interest. We will not generally be able to issue and sell our common stock at a price below net asset value per share. We may, however, sell our common stock, or warrants, options or rights to acquire our common stock, at a price below the then current net asset value per share of our common stock if our board of directors determines that such sale is in our best interests and in the best interests of our stockholders, and our stockholders approve such sale. In any such case, the price at which our securities are to be issued and sold may not be less than a price that, in the determination of our board of directors, closely approximates the market value of such securities (less any distributing commission or discount). If we raise additional funds by issuing more common stock or senior securities convertible into, or exchangeable for, our common stock, then the percentage ownership of our stockholders at that time will decrease, and you may experience dilution
The authorization and issuance of “blank check” preferred shares could have an anti-takeover effect detrimental to the interests of our stockholders.

47

Table of Contents

Our certificate of incorporation allows our board of directors to issue preferred shares with rights and preferences set by the board without further stockholder approval. The issuance of these “blank check” preferred shares could have an anti-takeover effect detrimental to the interests of our stockholders. For example, in the event of a hostile takeover attempt, it may be possible for management and the board to impede the attempt by issuing the preferred shares, thereby diluting or impairing the voting power of the other outstanding common shares and increasing the potential costs to acquire control of us. Our board has the right to issue any new shares, including preferred shares, without first offering them to the holders of common shares, as they have no preemptive rights.
We know of no other publicly-held company that sponsors and operates Capcos as a part of its business. As such, there are, to our knowledge, no other companies against which investors may compare our Capco business and its operations, results of operations and financial and accounting structures.
In the absence of any meaningful peer group comparisons for our Capco business, investors may have a difficult time understanding and judging the strength of our business. This, in turn, may have a depressing effect on the value of our stock.

Provisions of the Maryland General Corporation Law and of our charter and bylaws could deter takeover attempts and have an adverse impact on the price of our common stock.

The Maryland General Corporation Law and our charter and bylaws contain provisions that may discourage, delay or make more difficult a change in control of Newtek or the removal of our directors. We are subject to the Maryland Business Combination Act, subject to any applicable requirements of the 1940 Act. Our board of directors has adopted a resolution exempting from the Business Combination Act any business combination between us and any other person, subject to prior approval of such business combination by our board, including approval by a majority of our independent directors. If the resolution exempting business combinations is repealed or our board does not approve a business combination, the Business Combination Act may discourage third parties from trying to acquire control of us and increase the difficulty of consummating such an offer. Our bylaws exempt from the Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act acquisitions of our stock by any person. If we amend our bylaws to repeal the exemption from the Control Share Acquisition Act, the Control Share Acquisition Act also may make it more difficult for a third party to obtain control of us and increase the difficulty of consummating such a transaction.

We have also adopted measures that may make it difficult for a third party to obtain control of us, including provisions of our charter classifying our board of directors in three classes serving staggered three-year terms in conjunction with the Conversion, and authorizing our board of directors to classify or reclassify shares of our stock in one or more classes or series, to cause the issuance of additional shares of our stock, to amend our charter without stockholder approval and to increase or decrease the number of shares of stock that we have authority to issue. These provisions, as well as other provisions of our charter and bylaws, may delay, defer or prevent a transaction or a change in control that might otherwise be in the best interests of our stockholders.

Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market may have an adverse effect on the market price of our common stock

All of the common stock held by our executive officers and directors, representing approximately 1,235,000 shares, or approximately 12% of our total outstanding shares, are subject to lock-up periods of at least 180 days as a result of our November 2014 stock offering. Upon expiration of this lock-up period, or earlier upon the consent of JMP Securities LLC, such shares will generally be freely tradable in the public market. Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock, or the availability of such common stock for sale, could adversely affect the prevailing market prices for our common stock. If this occurs and continues, it could impair our ability to raise additional capital through the sale of securities should we desire to do so.
Failure to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting may lead investors and others to lose confidence in our financial data.
In evaluating the effectiveness of its internal controls over financial reporting in connection with the preparation of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, management concluded that there was a material weakness in internal control over financial reporting related to accounting for one bank account holding funds belonging to customers of our merchant processing portfolio company. These material weaknesses made it possible for a former senior manager to utilize funds in this account to conceal knowledge of growing merchant processing chargeback losses among a group of merchants solicited by one of the Company’s former agents. Following discovery, this resulted in the need for the restatement of the Company’s financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2011, together with financial

48

Table of Contents

statements for the quarters ended March 31, 2012, June 30, 2012 and September 30, 2012, the periods over which these losses occurred.
The Company has remediated these material weaknesses and has, among other things, replaced the manager responsible, strengthened its internal control team by hiring a very seasoned Chief Risk Officer, augmented its finance team and has implemented and modified certain accounting and internal control procedures. If the Company fails to otherwise maintain effective controls over financial reporting in the future, it could again result in a material misstatement of its financial statements that might not be prevented or detected on a timely basis and which could then cause investors and others to lose confidence in the Company’s financial statements, which in turn could have a negative effect on the value of the Company’s equity securities.
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.
Not applicable.
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES.
We conduct our principal business activities in facilities leased from unrelated parties at market rates. Our headquarters are located in New York, New York. Our operating subsidiaries and portfolio companies have properties which are material to the conduct of their business as noted below. In addition, our Capcos maintain offices in each of the states in which they operate.
Below is a list of our leased offices and space as of December 31, 2014 which are material to the conduct of our business:
Location
 
Lease expiration
 
Purpose
 
Approx. sq. ft
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
212 West 35th Street
New York, NY 10001
 
Oct 2015
 
Lease of principal executive offices (Corporate activities and SBA lending)
 
5,700

4 Park Plaza
Irvine, CA 92614
 
Feb 2016
 
Newtek Small Business Finance offices
 
3,300

1440 Broadway
New York, New York 10018
 
Oct 2015
 
Sublet - former principal
executive offices
 
23,000

60 Hempstead Avenue
West Hempstead, NY 11552
 
Apr 2019
 
Newtek Small Business Finance; Newtek Business Credit Offices (portfolio company) and NY Capco offices
 
22,000

We believe that our leased facilities are adequate to meet our current needs and that additional facilities are available to meet our development and expansion needs in existing and projected target markets.
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.
In the ordinary course of business, the Company may from time to time be party to lawsuits and claims. The Company evaluates such matters on a case by case basis and its policy is to contest vigorously any claims it believes are without compelling merit. The Company is currently involved in various litigation matters. 

On January 21, 2014, NCMIC Finance Corporation (“NCMIC”) filed a complaint against Universal Processing Services of Wisconsin, LLC (“UPS”), the Company’s merchant processing portfolio company, in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Iowa. The Complaint asserts claims against UPS for breach of the UPS and NCMIC agreement for the processing of credit card transactions, and seeks monetary relief. The Company believes that the claims asserted in the complaint are wholly without merit and intends to vigorously defend the action.
As previously disclosed, during the quarter ended June 30, 2013, the Federal Trade Commission (the “FTC”) amended an existing complaint in the matter Federal Trade Commission v. WV Universal Management, LLC et al., pending in the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida (the “Court”), to add UPS as an additional defendant on one count of providing substantial assistance in violation of the Telemarketing Sales Rule. On November 18, 2014, the Court issued an Order granting the FTC’s motion for summary judgment against UPS on the single count. Subsequently, the FTC filed motions for a permanent injunction and equitable monetary belief against UPS and the other remaining defendants. Prior to the Court hearing on the motions, UPS and the FTC reached a settlement on the FTC’s motion for a permanent injunction, subject to final

49

Table of Contents

approval of the FTC. On February 11, 2015, the Court granted the FTC’s motion for equitable relief against UPS and the other remaining defendants, ordering that the remaining defendants pay $1,735,000 in equitable monetary relief. While the Court has yet to issue a judgement setting forth the terms of the relief granted, UPS has recorded a reserve for the full amount of the potential loss as of December 31, 2014, which is reflected in the full year pro forma results reported for the segment in Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. The Company strongly disagrees with the court's Orders on summary judgment and equitable monetary relief, and once a judgment is issued, the Company will decide what actions to take, including taking an appeal of such rulings
Management has reviewed all other legal claims against the Company with counsel and has taken into consideration the views of such counsel, as to the outcome of the claims. In management’s opinion, final disposition of all such claims will not have a material adverse effect on the results of operations, cash flows or financial position of the Company.
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES.
Not applicable.

50

Table of Contents

PART II
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.
(a) Market Information: Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “NEWT.” High and low prices for the common stock over the previous two years are set forth below, based on the highest and lowest daily closing price during that period (adjusted for the 1-for-5 Reverse Stock Split).
 
Price Range
 
 
 
 
 
 
Period
High
 
Low
 
NAV (1)
 
Premium (Discount) of High Sales price to NAV(2)
 
Premium (Discount) of Low Sales price to NAV(2)
First Quarter: January 1, 2013 Through March 31, 2013
$
11.05

 
$
8.30

 
$
10.00

 
10
 %
 
(17
)%
Second Quarter: April 1, 2013 Through June 30, 2013
$
11.25

 
$
9.50

 
$
10.26

 
10
 %
 
(7
)%
Third Quarter: July 1, 2013 Through September 30, 2013
$
15.35

 
$
10.30

 
$
10.54

 
46
 %
 
(2
)%
Fourth Quarter: October 1, 2013 Through December 31, 2013
$
16.00

 
$
12.50

 
$
10.88

 
47
 %
 
15
 %
First Quarter: January 1, 2014 Through March 31, 2014
$
17.15

 
$
13.70

 
$
11.07

 
55
 %
 
24
 %
Second Quarter: April 1, 2014 Through June 30, 2014
$
14.50

 
$
12.55

 
$
11.31

 
28
 %
 
11
 %
Third Quarter: July 1, 2014 Through September 30, 2014
$
14.70

 
$
11.30

 
$
10.91

 
35
 %
 
4
 %
Fourth Quarter: October 1, 2014 Through December 31, 2014
$
15.75

 
$
12.61

 
$
16.31

 
(3
)%
 
(23
)%
(1) Net asset value per share is determined as of the last day in the relevant quarter and therefore may not reflect the net asset value per share on the date of the high and low sales price. The values reflect stockholders equity per share and are based on outstanding shares at the end of each period.
(2) Calculated as the respective high or low sales price less net asset value or stockholders equity per share, as applicable, divided by net asset value or stockholders equity per share, as applicable.
The last reported price for our common stock on March 18, 2015 was $18.70 per share. As of March 18, 2015 there were approximately 49 holders of record and beneficial holders of our common stock.
Shares of BDCs may trade at a market price that is less than the value of the net assets attributable to those shares. The possibility that our shares of common stock will trade at a discount from net asset value or at premiums that are unsustainable over the long term are separate and distinct from the risk that our net asset value will decrease.

Sales of Unregistered Securities
 
We did not engage in any sales of unregistered securities during the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012.

Distributions
We have not declared or paid regular quarterly dividends during our prior three fiscal years, in view of our focus on retaining earnings for growth.
Beginning in the first quarter of 2015, and to the extent that we have income available, we intend to make quarterly distributions to our stockholders out of assets legally available for distribution. Our quarterly distributions, if any, will be determined by our board of directors.

51

Table of Contents

Any distribution to our stockholders will be declared out of assets legally available for distribution. Distributions in excess of current and accumulated earnings and profits will be treated as a non-taxable return of capital to the extent of a stockholder's basis in our stock and, assuming that a stockholder holds our stock as a capital asset, thereafter as a capital gain. Generally, a non-taxable return of capital will reduce a stockholder’s basis in our stock for federal tax purposes, which will result in higher tax liability when the stock is sold.
We intend to elect to be treated, and intend to qualify annually thereafter, as a RIC under the Code, beginning with our first taxable year after the BDC Conversion, or 2015. To obtain and maintain RIC tax treatment, we must distribute at least 90% of our net ordinary income and net short-term capital gains in excess of our net long-term capital losses, if any, to our stockholders. In order to avoid certain excise taxes imposed on RICs, we currently intend to distribute during each calendar year an amount at least equal to the sum of: (a) 98% of our net ordinary income for such calendar year; (b) 98.2% of our capital gain net income for the one-year period ending on October 31 of the calendar year; and (c) any net ordinary income and capital gain net income for preceding years that were not distributed during such years and on which we previously paid no U.S. federal income tax.
We currently intend to distribute net capital gains (i.e., net long-term capital gains in excess of net short-term capital losses), if any, at least annually out of the assets legally available for such distributions. However, we may decide in the future to retain such capital gains for investment and elect to treat such gains as deemed distributions to you. If this happens, stockholders will be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as if they had received an actual distribution of the capital gains that we retain and reinvested the net after tax proceeds in us. In this situation, stockholders would be eligible to claim a tax credit (or in certain circumstances a tax refund) equal to their allocable share of the tax we paid on the capital gains deemed distributed to them. We cannot assure stockholders that we will achieve results that will permit us to pay any cash distributions, and if we issue senior securities, we may be prohibited from making distributions if doing so would cause us to fail to maintain the asset coverage ratios stipulated by the 1940 Act or if such distributions are limited by the terms of any of our borrowings.
 
Unless stockholders elect to receive distributions in cash, we intend to make such distributions in additional shares of our common stock under our dividend reinvestment plan. Although distributions paid in the form of additional shares of our common stock will generally be subject to U.S. federal, state and local taxes in the same manner as cash distributions, investors participating in the dividend reinvestment plan will not receive any corresponding cash distributions with which to pay any such applicable taxes.

On March 19, 2015, our Board declared a distribution as set forth in the following table:
Record Date
 
Payment Date
 
Distribution Declared
March 30, 2015
 
April 13, 2015
 
$
0.39

Securities authorized for issuance under equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2014:
Plan Category
 
(a)
Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
(b)
Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights
 
(c)
Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in column (a))
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
 
None
 
None
 
3,000,000 shares
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders
 
None
 
None
 
None
__________
(b)
Not applicable.
(c)
Not applicable.


Stock Performance Graph 
The following graph compares the return on our common stock with that of the Standard & Poor’s 500 Stock Index and the NASDAQ Composite Index, for the period from December 31, 2009 through December 31, 2014. The graph assumes that, on

52

Table of Contents

January 1, 2010, a person invested $100 in each of our common stock, the S&P 500 Index, and the NASDAQ Financial Services Index. The graph measures total stockholder return, which takes into account both changes in stock price and dividends. It assumes that dividends paid are invested in like securities.
        
ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.
The following selected statements of income and balance sheet data have been derived from the audited financial statements for each of the five years ended December 31, 2014. The Consolidated Financial Statements for the three years ended December 31, 2012 have been audited by CohnReznick LLP. The Consolidated Financial Statements for the two years ended December 31, 2014 have been audited by McGladrey LLP. The selected financial data set forth below should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified by reference to, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our Consolidated Financial Statements, including the Notes thereto, available at www.sec.gov.
 
 
November 12, 2014 to December 31, 2014
 
January 1, 2014 to November 11, 2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Investment income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
From non-controlled/non-affiliate investments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest income
 
$
1,076

 

 

 

 

 

Servicing income
 
562

 

 

 

 

 

Other income
 
270

 

 

 

 

 

Total investment income from non-controlled/non-affiliate investments
 
1,908

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
From controlled/affiliate investments
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

Interest income
 
27

 

 

 

 

 

Dividend income
 
37

 

 

 

 

 

Other income
 
4

 

 

 

 

 

Total investment income from controlled/affiliate investments
 
68

 

 

 

 

 

Total investment income
 
1,976

 

 

 

 

 

Operating revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Electronic payment processing
 

 
$
79,527

 
$
89,651

 
$
85,483

 
$
82,473

 
$
80,920

Web hosting and design
 

 
13,730

 
17,375

 
18,208

 
19,181

 
19,164


53

Table of Contents

 
 
November 12, 2014 to December 31, 2014
 
January 1, 2014 to November 11, 2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Premium income
 

 
18,623

 
19,456

 
12,367

 
12,468

 
2,428

Interest income
 

 
5,663

 
4,838

 
3,422

 
2,629

 
1,903

Servicing fee income
 

 
9,253

 
6,565

 
6,862

 
3,101

 
2,568

Income from tax credits
 

 
48

 
113

 
522

 
1,390

 
2,380

Insurance commissions
 

 
1,480

 
1,737

 
1,205

 
1,071

 
886

Other income
 

 
3,523

 
3,858

 
3,061

 
3,026

 
2,470

Total operating revenues
 

 
131,847

 
143,593

 
131,130

 
125,339

 
112,719

Net change in fair value of:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SBA loans
 
 
 
(3,663
)
 
(1,226
)
 
(1,013
)
 
(5,493
)
 
3,494

Warrants
 
 
 

 

 
(111
)
 

 

Credits in lieu of cash and notes payable in credits in lieu of cash
 
 
 
(5
)
 
21

 
3

 
(131
)
 
38

Total net change in fair value
 
 
 
(3,668
)
 
(1,205
)
 
(1,121
)
 
(5,624
)
 
3,532

Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Electronic payment processing costs
 

 
67,011

 
75,761

 
72,183

 
69,389

 
68,187

Salaries and benefits
 
1,458

 
23,373

 
24,360

 
22,314

 
21,042

 
19,391

Interest
 
568

 
7,323

 
5,863

 
4,495

 
3,416

 
4,479

Depreciation and amortization
 
43

 
3,140

 
3,284

 
3,036

 
3,955

 
4,709

Goodwill impairment
 

 
1,706

 

 

 

 

Provision for loan losses
 

 
(53
)
 
1,322

 
810

 
763

 
1,909

Other general and administrative costs
 
2,236

 
18,536

 
20,729

 
17,732

 
19,122

 
16,699

Total expenses
 
4,305

 
121,036

 
131,319

 
120,570

 
117,687

 
115,374

Net investment loss before income tax
 
(2,329
)
 
 
 

 

 

 

Provision for income tax - post BDC
 
194

 

 

 

 

 

Net investment loss
 
(2,523
)
 
 
 

 

 

 

Net realized and unrealized gain (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net realized gain on non-affiliate investments
 
595

 

 

 

 

 

Net unrealized appreciation on non-affiliate investments
 
2,733

 

 

 

 

 

Net unrealized depreciation on servicing assets
 
(120
)
 

 

 

 

 

Net unrealized depreciation in credits in lieu of cash and notes payable in credits in lieu of cash
 
(4
)
 

 

 

 

 

Net realized and unrealized gains
 
3,204

 
 
 

 

 

 

Income before income taxes
 

 
7,143

 
11,069

 
9,439

 
2,028

 
877

Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
 
$
681

 

 

 

 

 

Provision for income taxes
 

 
3,935

 
3,918

 
3,882

 
(1,195
)
 
(418
)
Net income
 

 
3,208

 
7,151

 
5,557

 
3,223

 
1,295

Net loss attributable to non-controlling interests
 

 
85

 
377

 
86

 
112

 
144

Net income attributable to Newtek Business Services Corp.
 

 
3,293

 
$
7,528

 
$
5,643

 
$
3,335

 
$
1,439

Weighted average common shares outstanding:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

54

Table of Contents

 
 
November 12, 2014 to December 31, 2014
 
January 1, 2014 to November 11, 2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Basic
 

 
7,315

 
7,059

 
7,105

 
7,141

 
7,131

Diluted
 

 
7,315

 
7,581

 
7,349

 
7,215

 
7,160

Basic income per share
 

 
$
0.45

 
$
1.01

 
$
0.79

 
$
0.47

 
$
0.20

Diluted income per share
 

 
$
0.45

 
$
0.94

 
$
0.77

 
$
0.46

 
$
0.20

Net increase in net assets per share
 
$
0.09

 

 

 

 

 

Net investment loss per share
 
$
(0.33
)
 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average shares outstanding
 
7,620

 

 

 

 

 

Balance Sheet Data (at end of period):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investments, at fair value
 
233,462

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets
 
$
301,832

 

 
$
198,612

 
$
152,742

 
$
129,795

 
$
165,015

Notes payable
 
$
43,023

 

 
$
41,218

 
$
39,823

 
$
13,565

 
$
28,053

Securitization notes payable
 
$
79,520

 

 
$
60,140

 
$
22,039

 
$
26,368

 
$
15,104

Notes payable in credits in lieu of cash
 
$
2,229

 

 
$
3,641

 
$
8,703

 
$
16,948

 
$
35,494

Deferred tax asset (liability)
 
$
2,873

 

 
$
3,606

 
$
2,318

 
$
170

 
$
(3,002
)
Non-controlling interests
 
$

 

 
$
1,665

 
$
2,055

 
$
1,180

 
$
1,309

Net assets/stockholders' equity
 
$
166,418

 

 
$
77,009

 
$
68,902

 
$
59,153

 
$
55,594

Common shares outstanding at year end
 
10,206

 

 
7,077

 
7,036

 
7,140

 
7,133

Newtek Business Services Corp. net asset value/stockholders' equity per share
 
$
16.31

 

 
$
10.88

 
$
9.79

 
$
8.28

 
$
7.79

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.
Introduction and Certain Cautionary Statements
The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is intended to assist in the understanding and assessment of significant changes and trends related to the results of operations and financial position of the Company together with its subsidiaries. This discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes.
The statements in this Annual Report may contain forward-looking statements relating to such matters as anticipated future financial  performance, business prospects, legislative developments and similar matters. We note that a variety of  factors could cause our actual results to differ materially from the anticipated results expressed in the forward looking statements  such as intensified competition and/or operating problems in its operating business projects and their impact on revenues and profit  margins or additional factors as described under “Risk Factors” above.
We also need to point out that our Capcos operate under a different set of rules in each of the six jurisdictions and that these place varying requirements on the structure of our investments. In some cases, particularly in Louisiana, we do not control the equity or management of a qualified business.
The discussion and analysis of our results of operations below are discussed on a "pro forma" basis. As previously discussed, the Company completed it conversion to a business development company on November 12, 2014. As a result the Company will no longer have six reportable segments. Previously consolidated subsidiaries are now recorded as controlled portfolio companies for which the company records its investment at fair value. For purposes of the 2014 discussion and analysis below, the financial information is presented as if the conversion to a business development company had not occurred. We believe this provides the most useful comparison of our year over year results.
Executive Overview

55

Table of Contents

We are a leading national lender and own and control certain portfolio companies (our “controlled portfolio companies,” as defined below) that provide a wide range of business and financial products to SMBs. In particular, we and our controlled portfolio companies provide comprehensive lending, payment processing, managed technology, personal and commercial insurance and payroll solutions to over 100,000 SMB accounts, across all industries. We have an established and reliable platform that is not limited by client size, industry type or location. As a result, we have a strong and diversified client base across every state in the U.S and across a variety of different industries. In addition, we have developed a financial and technology based business model that enables us and our controlled portfolio companies to acquire and process our SMB clients in a very cost effective manner. This capability is supported in large part by NewTracker®, our patented prospect management technology software, which is similar to but better than the system popularized by Salesforce.com. We believe that this technology and business model distinguishes us from our competitors.
Consolidated Pro Forma Results of Operations Before BDC Election
For the year ended December 31, 2014, the Company recorded pro forma pretax income of $7,497,000, a $3,572,000 decrease from $11,069,000 pretax income in 2013. Total pro forma revenues increased by $5,171,000, or 3.6%, to $148,764,000 compared to $143,593,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013 principally due to increased revenues in the Small business finance and Electronic payment processing segments. Total expenses increased by $8,832,000 to $140,151,000 for the year ended 2014 from $131,319,000 for 2013 primarily due to increases in electronic payment processing costs, goodwill impairment, other general and administrative costs, and salaries and benefits.
Contributing to the decrease in pro forma pretax income from $11,069,000 in 2013 to $8,154,000 in 2014 were a goodwill impairment charge of $1,706,000 in the Small business finance segment, a 19% decrease in pro forma pretax net income in the electronic processing segment which included a charge related to a potential legal judgment against the segment of $1,735,000. Decreases were offset by an increase in pro forma pretax net income in the small business finance segment related to an increase in servicing and interest income.
One of the primary contributors to Newtek’s continued profitability was the small business finance segment which generated pro forma pretax income of $12,873,000 in 2014 compared to $10,143,000 in 2013, an increase of $2,730,000. The primary drivers were servicing fee income on NSBF and external portfolios which in 2014 increased by $3,630,000, or 55% and interest income which increased $1,927,000 or 40%. Total SBA loans originated increased to $202,269,000 in 2014 compared with $177,941,000 for 2013. The weighted average sales price for the guaranteed portions of SBA loans sold increased slightly to 112.49% compared with 112.32% for 2014 and 2013, respectively.
The electronic payment processing segment recorded a 19% decrease in pro forma pretax net income, which decreased to $6,728,000 in 2014 from $8,304,000 compared with the 2013 period. Pro forma revenue increased by $1,505,000 or 2% to $91,160,000 during 2014 compared to 2013. The increase was related to growth in processing volumes and fee increases passed on to merchants. Processing revenue less processing costs increased from 15.5% in 2013 to 15.9% in 2014. While margin was favorably impacted by the implementation and growth of fees, the increase was offset by an increase in provision for chargebacks in 2014 attributed to a specific merchant that experienced a high level of chargebacks as well as a charge related to a potential legal judgment against the company.
Pro forma pretax net income for managed technology solutions decreased from $3,564,000 in the year ended December 31, 2013 to $3,081,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014. Segment pro forma revenue decreased by 10% due primarily to a reduction in web hosting revenue driven by a reduction in active plans. It continues to be management’s intent to increase revenue and margin per plan through higher service offerings to customers which include cloud-based applications. Management has broadened the Company’s focus beyond the Microsoft web platform by now providing its platform capabilities to include open source web applications which have become increasingly attractive to web developers and resellers.
In December 2014, a Company subsidiary closed its fifth securitization issuing an additional $31,700,000 in notes with an “A” rating under S&P; see Securitzation Transactions in Part II Item 7.

Consolidated Results of Operations Post BDC election:
 
As a BDC, we are subject to certain constraints on our operations, including limitations imposed by the 1940 Act. In addition, due to the conversion from an operating company to a BDC on November 12, 2014, there is no prior period results to compare the reportable period to, and the results below only reflect the results of the Company for the period November 12, 2014 through December 31, 2014.
  

56

Table of Contents

Investment Income
 
Total investment income was $1,976,000 for the period November 12, 2014 through December 31, 2014. Investment income from non-controlled non-affiliates was $1,912,000 and consisted of $1,080,000 in interest income earned primarily from our SBA loan portfolio. Servicing income earned was $562,000 related to our SBA loan portfolio. Other income from non-controlled non-affiliates for the period was $270,000 and consists of fees earned such as closing, packaging, and late payment fees related to our SBA loan portfolio.

Investment income from controlled affiliate investments was $64,000 for the period November 12, 2014 through December 31, 2014 and consisted of $37,000 in dividend income from a controlled portfolio company and $23,000 of interest income from various controlled portfolio companies.

Expenses
 
Total expenses for the period post BDC election were $4,305,000. Total operating expenses for the period consisted principally of salaries and benefits, interest expense, professional fees and general and administrative expenses. Salaries and benefits relate to our lending subsidiary and corporate employees of the BDC. Interest expense relates to the term loan held by the BDC, the revolving credit facility of SBF and the securitization notes payable.

Since the Company will not be eligible for the RIC election until 2015, the company recorded a tax provision for the period which is reflective of the Company filing a consolidated C-Corp return for the full year. As a result, the Company recorded a tax provision for the period November 12, 2014 through December 31, 2014 of $194,000.
 
Net Realized Gains and Net Unrealized Appreciation and Depreciation
 
Realized gains or losses on investments are measured by the difference between the net proceeds from the repayment or sale and the cost basis of our investments without regard to unrealized appreciation or depreciation previously recognized and includes investments charged off during the period, net of recoveries. The net change in unrealized appreciation or depreciation on investments primarily reflects the change in portfolio investment fair values during the reporting period, including the reversal of previously recorded unrealized appreciation or depreciation when gains or losses are realized.
 
For the period November 12, 2014 through December 31, 2014, we had net realized gains totaling $595,000 primarily due to the sale of non-controlled non-affiliate investments (SBA loans) into a secondary market during the period.
 
 
For the period November 12, 2014 through December 31, 2014, net unrealized appreciation on non-affiliate investments totaled $2,733,000 which was primarily due to unrealized appreciation on 30 non-affiliate debt investments which have not yet traded as of December 31, 2014.
Business Segment Results:
The results of the Company’s reportable business segments presented for the full year on a pro forma basis are discussed below.
The tables below are presented to distinguish operating results for January 1, 2014 through November 11, 2014 (prior to BDC Conversion) and the period from November 12, 2014 to December 31, 2014 (post BDC Conversion). The combined results for 2014 are presented under the column "Pro Forma 2014 (Unaudited)" and represent the full year results for the segment. We believe this presentation provides the most useful comparison of our year over year results.

57

Table of Contents

Electronic Payment Processing

(In thousands):
Pro Forma 2014 (Unaudited)
 
For the period November 12, 2014 through December 31, 2014 (Unaudited)
 
For the period January 1, 2014 through November 11, 2014
 
2013
 
2012
Revenue:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Electronic payment processing
$
91,158

 
$
11,631

 
$
79,527

 
$
89,651

 
$
85,483

Interest income
2

 

 
2

 
4

 
6

Total revenue
91,160

 
11,631

 
79,529

 
89,655

 
85,489

Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Electronic payment processing costs
76,620

 
9,659

 
66,961

 
75,761

 
72,183

Salaries and benefits
4,001

 
536

 
3,465

 
3,485

 
3,991

Professional fees
2,377

 
1,919

 
458

 
458

 
323

Depreciation and amortization
261

 
35

 
226

 
358

 
743

Insurance expense – related party
56

 
6

 
50

 
57

 
61

Other general and administrative costs
1,117

 
114

 
1,003

 
1,232

 
1,147

Total expenses
84,432

 
12,269

 
72,163

 
81,351

 
78,448

Income before income taxes
$
6,728

 
$
(638
)
 
$
7,366

 
$
8,304

 
$
7,041

Comparison of the years ended December 31, 2014 (Pro forma) and December 31, 2013

EPP revenue increased $1,507,000 or 1.7% between years. Revenue increased primarily due to the implementation of a monthly non-compliance fee and annual compliance service fee, increase in discount fee rates to merchants and an increase in processing volume generated by an increase in the average monthly processing volume per merchant of 5.0% between periods. Offsetting this increase was a 3.3% decrease in the number of merchant transactions and a decrease in the average number of processing merchants of 3.5%, between periods. The decrease in merchants includes the expected attrition in previously acquired portfolios.

Processing revenues less electronic payment processing costs (“margin”) increased from 15.5% in 2013 to 15.9% in 2014. The increase in margin was primarily due to the implementation of a monthly non-compliance fee, implementation of an annual compliance service fee and an increase in rates to merchants.. This increase was partially offset by an increase in the provision for chargeback losses attributable to a specific merchant that experienced a high level of chargebacks. Overall, the increase in margin dollars was $648,000 between years.
  
Salaries and benefits increased $516,000 or 14.8% between years. This increase is due to the Company hiring additional senior level staff, which resulted in overall higher salaries, payroll taxes, benefits and stock compensation for the year. Salaries and benefits in the current year also include a severance payment of approximately $120,000 to a former senior executive. Partially offsetting this increase was a reduction in health insurance costs of $48,000 and a $27,000 increase in capitalized salaries as compared to last year. Salary costs related to the development of internally developed software is capitalized and as a result decreases salary expense and increases depreciation and amortization expense over the future service period.

Professional fees increased $1,919,000 or 419.0% between years due to a reserve established in the amount of approximately $1,700,000 related to the FTC matter which is discussed in detail in Item 3. Legal Proceedings. Depreciation and amortization decreased $97,000 between periods as the result of previously acquired customer merchant portfolios becoming fully amortized between periods. Remaining costs decreased $115, 000 or 9.3% between years largely due to a decrease in marketing expense of $212,000 as the result the discontinuation of a marketing cost allocation in early 2014. This decrease was partially offset by an increase of $56,000 in travel expenses and $42,000 in office expense.

Income before income taxes decreased $1,576,000 or 19.0% to $6,728,000 in 2014 from $8,304,000 in 2013. The decrease in income before income taxes was due to the increase in margin of $648,000, offset by a net increase in other operating expense between years principally due to the $1,700,000 FTC reserve in the 2014 period.

58

Table of Contents


Comparison of the years ended December 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012
EPP revenue increased $4,168,000 or 5% between years, primarily due to growth in processing volumes and the effect of card association fee increases passed through to merchants. Processing volumes were favorably impacted by a 1% increase in the average number of processing merchants under contract between periods and an increase of approximately 6% in the average monthly processing volume per merchant. The increase in the average monthly processing volume per merchant is due in part to the addition of several larger volume processing merchants as well as year-over-year growth in processing volumes from existing merchants. This overall increase in revenue between years was partially offset by lower average pricing between years due to competitive pricing considerations, particularly for larger processing volume merchants with lower revenue per transaction, between periods.
Electronic payment processing (“EPP”) costs increased $3,578,000 or 5% between years. The increase in EPP costs includes a provision for charge-back losses of $579,000 and $1,832,000 in 2013 and 2012, respectively. The provision for charge-back losses in 2012 included losses of $1,312,000 related to a group of merchants affiliated with one of its independent sales agents, which were unilaterally approved by a former senior manager of the EPP division and such charge-back losses resulted from violations of credit policy by such senior manager. EPP revenue less EPP costs, or “margin” decreased from 15.6% in 2012 to 15.5% in 2013. Margin was favorably impacted by the reduction in provisions for chargebacks between years by 1.5%. However, the favorable impact on margin of the aforementioned factors were slightly more than offset by lower average pricing between years due to both competitive pricing considerations, particularly for larger volume merchants, and the mix of merchant sales volumes realized between periods. Overall, the increase in margin dollars was $590,000 between years.
Salaries and benefits decreased by $506,000 or 13% between years principally as the result of a reduction in staffing levels and a reduction in accrued bonuses for the year. Average FTE’s for the twelve month period decreased from 67.5 to 61.2 between years. Professional fees increased by $135,000 principally due to costs incurred in assessing the loss related to and the actions of the agent and the former senior management of EPP related to the charge-back losses associated with a group of merchants discussed above. Depreciation and amortization decreased $385,000 between periods as the result of previously acquired customer merchant portfolios becoming fully amortized between periods. Other costs increased $81,000 or 6% between years. During 2012, office relocation costs of approximately $50,000 were incurred.
Income before income taxes increased $1,263,000 to $8,304,000 in 2013 from $7,041,000 in 2012. The increase in income before income taxes was principally due to the increase in margin of $590,000 due to the reasons noted above and the decreases in other costs, principally payroll and related costs and depreciation and amortization cost between years













59

Table of Contents

Small Business Finance 
(In thousands):
Pro Forma 2014 (Unaudited)
 
For the period November 12, 2014 through December 31, 2014 (Unaudited)
 
For the period January 1, 2014 through November 11, 2014
 
2013
 
2012
Revenue:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Premium on loan sales
$
19,493

 
$
870

 
$
18,623

 
$
19,456

 
$
12,367

Servicing fee – NSBF Portfolio
3,671

 
561

 
3,110

 
2,769

 
2,298

Servicing fee – External Portfolio
6,524

 
382

 
6,142

 
3,796

 
4,564

Interest income
6,729

 
1,079

 
5,650

 
4,802

 
3,370

Management fees – related party
146

 
146

 

 

 
293

Other income
3,142

 
241

 
2,901

 
3,289

 
2,516

Total revenue
39,705

 
3,279

 
36,426

 
34,112

 
25,408

Net change in fair value of:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Servicing Asset
(120
)
 
(120
)
 

 

 

SBA loans held for sale
2,872